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  1. Bill's Magic Vapor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarthEmma
    Great read.

    I have a quick question. Did you ever try Vanillin in this mix instead of (or together with) FVD? I'm curious to know how each affects the mix differently.

    Thanks for posting these trials you do. It really helps me fine tune how I approach my own testing.
    Not in this mix, but I have played with it in my vanilla mixes. Since I've used this combo before in my fudge brownie, I didn't want to mess up a winning mix (for me!). Good luck!
  2. DarthEmma's Avatar
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    Great read.

    I have a quick question. Did you ever try Vanillin in this mix instead of (or together with) FVD? I'm curious to know how each affects the mix differently.

    Thanks for posting these trials you do. It really helps me fine tune how I approach my own testing.
  3. aikanae1's Avatar
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  4. RayofLight62's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baditude
    And who made you a mod battery expert? What percentage of mod batteries used today are NiMH? Only a fraction if any.

    Our ECF forum manager Rolygate is a reknown battery expert and wrote this blog about mod batteries and battery safety. RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES

    He states that IMR batteries are indeed the safest batteries for mod usage. I took much of the information for my blog from his data and from other sources listed as references at the bottom of the page. No where have I read that NiMH batteries are the safest. Regardless of this, NiMH batteries are a non-factor for the general vaping community. But thanks for your opinion.
    I was conducting a research about the max amp of some cells, and Google for some reasons directed me to this post.
    By reading it, it almost pulled the ink off my pen (well, not literally) and provide a reply.
    Other than a vaper, I believe to know a thing or two about batteries. I did my stuff a lifetime ago into another world (the flashlights community) at the onset of lithium technology; in another virtual space, in year 2003-2004 we developed the first protected rechargeable Li-Ion 123 (the entire operation went bust since the FarEast manufacturer started selling the thing on its own).
    The first Li-Ions using lithium cobaltite 18650 were developed in US (well, Canada) with a laptop in mind. Long runtime, long cycle life. Safety was addressed, first time in battery history, with protective circuitry (SMD power MOSFET just developed) and a dedicated data bus. Double protection (in the charger and battery) were (and still are) the norm in all western design using Li-Ion. This because lithium cobaltite, the ion-storage material, has the bad habit to self-combust in absence of oxygen at temperature above 160 Celsius, with pyrotechnique results, and is unestinguishable. To this day, Li-Ion batteries are not sellable to general public for this very liability. Use of bare Li-Ion batteries still require special training and certifications.
    For years we used Ni-Cd and Ni-MH for all our portable power. Ni-Cd of good quality have unlimited cycle life and do not suffer high drains; Ni-MH (which are the only positive outcome of researches on cold fusion) have limited cycle life and cannot stand high drain, but they took over because are totally "green" as they doesn't contain the cadmium, a toxic heavy metal, and allowed later the "hybrid" technology or ... (low self-discharge). So they became the battery of choice for moderate drain, non-professional use.
    Now, what pointed my intervention is the statement that Ni-MH are most suited for e-cig use. Wrong statement, in all possible shape and forms. It was in year 2008 that built a vape mod by modifying a 3xAA flashlight to test it; I got 30 cycles from Ni-MH and 350 cycles from Ni-Cd AA cells; fully in accordance with know data.
    Also, when shorted out, Ni-MH vent hydrogen gas, while Ni-CD vent oxygen. Ni-MH are prohybited use in sealed underwater lights, where only Ni-Cd are allowed.
    Ni-Cd didn't win the favours of the e-cig market for three reasons. First they are much bulkier than Li-Ions. Second, green laws have phased out Cadmium from consumer market, limiting its use to professional use where long cyclelife coupled with high drain are a must.
    Third reason, lithium minerals are mined in a couple of places on Earth, South America and Far East. China had the technology already developed and free access to the mineral, and they, as inventors of e-cig, set the standard on lithium.
    We developed Li-Mn and later,hybrid cathode battery to overcome the 1C current limit of Li-Co (ICR) cells, so they can be used in power tools. Less repeatibility (IMR do not balance well) but also less of a firework attitude. E-cig mod world found the Li-MN and hybrid batteries readily available for use. Some unattentive persons uses ICR in mods, but all of the battage on safety hopefully will increase knowledge to the point ICR will be sold with the marking "Do not use in e-cig". Hopefully. They are designed for computer battery packs. But make no mistake: all built-in mod batteries (the MVPs, the iSticks, virtually all non-replaceable battery box mods) do not use IMR (Li-MN) batteries inside: they use exclusively Li-Poly batteries. Now, Li-Poly (which uses hybrid cathodes) were designed with high surface exposure to provide very high currents, they are the batteries of choice in RC world. The chemicals are spread in very thin plastic films, they are built without a case or a metal container, just a foil bag. Thus they can set on fire, but not explode. The protective circuitry is mandatory but it is included in the mod box. Not having a container, they are very cheap to produce, and doesn't require expensive manufacturing equipment: this is why any e-cig, from cheap ego batteries to the most expensive Solara DNA mod box, contains lithium polymer batteries. Cheap, good, pretty safe (they make a big fire but no explosions). So, per manufacturer decisions, Li-Poly, to this date, are the most suitable batteries in e-cigs. But.
    Only for manufacturers. End user can't install Li-Poly in mod boxes (or tubes), because they need to be soldered. To be installed by end user, they should be encased, and this would transform them into a liability. End user can only install IMR batteries originally designed for power drills and high power flashlights. The real deal is off-limits per say of the lawyers.
    In reality, the most suitable battery for e-cigs are the LFP type. They could be easily and legally handed by end users, but there are two problems.
    The LFP battery is a Li-FePO4 (iron-phosphor-oxygen) battery where the cathode materials are made of multi-layered microspheres, built with semiconductor-like machinery, where the inner part of the sphere contains the energy, and its surface distribute this energy to the external electrodes.
    This is the state of the art in lithium batteries, 20 years calendar life and 2000 full cycles. But they are 3.2 Volt instead of 3.7 volt, and a 18650 is ten dollars versus 50 cents of a Li-poly 18650 (used in the 20W iStick). They do not fire up nor explode, accept overcharge and are not damaged by overdischarge. They are on sale for specialised uses and, having bought a 12V 10Ah to replace a lead acid battery, I can only confirm that they would be a vaper dream come true if used in a mod. But, again, chinese only manufacture them on licence, the LPF technology is very hard to crack and copy. They are the most suitable batteries for a e-cig mod.
    Regards to all
  5. JimmyDB's Avatar
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    Waaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
  6. shreduhsoreus's Avatar
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    Lol what a ....ing crybaby.
  7. Ricky Spanish's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting this, good info. I like my high PG juice even more now.
  8. MacTechVpr's Avatar
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    Darryl there's no picture guided tutorial on how to make tensioned twised-lead parallels. I wish more peeps would be bold enough to post pictorials on their tensioned successes. But I did write up a good description and some shots of an inexpensive aid that seems to be missing from the toolkit of most rebuilders — the common clamp.

    The clamp Luke, the clamp! includes some picture examples of how to stabilize coils and instructions using clamping to work on coils and particularly the fragile end-turns.

    We are intent it seems to wind obsolete coils solely by hand with the most challenging of approaches. No metric. Are we proving something by making it as difficult as possible? What does it bring us? A better vape? A more dependable one? We use tools to help us in everything that we do from kitchen to job site. But we attack the common coil as if the wheel had never been invented is beyond me.

    There are a lot of things we can adapt to making coils but it helps to use the right tool. An effective solution. Why not use what we use constructively elsewhere. A pin vise has been used forever for making coils. Clamps for securing things and keeping them together.

    Why walk when you can ride?

    For the essentials and all the help you may need on symmetry, coil localization, stabilization and tension winding may be found on the Protank MicroCoil Discussion!!

    For more advanced discussion on applying tensioned technology in your builds follow the thread Tensioned Micro Coils. The next step which super_X_driver and I are contributing to.

    An advanced search on either thread say for the term clamp should give you more information on this or any other interest you may have regarding building with tension as a tool.

    Good luck Darryl and thanks for the nod.

  9. Darryl Licht's Avatar
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    Mac - I wish you had a video or some tutorial of this build. If you do have a tut, please post the link or PM me please. What mystifies me is how you twist the leads once you are done with the tensioned wind. How does it not totally foul up the parallels???
  10. Sicrano's Avatar
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    One of my favourites NET e-juices, amazing! I'm using it with a dripper at 0.8 ohms, 15 watts. Trabuco makes great juices.
  11. Nick Jennings's Avatar
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    Did you snug everything up? Usually solves the problem. Make sure the chimney is clean. If problem still happens, tip upside down and hold fire button for a few seconds. This usually works for me when my tank gurgles.
  12. juggler86's Avatar
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    Nice bic pen drip tip, ive rocked a cpl of those.
  13. Baditude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bittermelon
    Hi Bad,

    what's the amp limit for my AW IMR 14500 3.7V 600mAh? Using for powering my REO Mini (original). Thanks.
    The "new" AW IMR14500 650mAh batteries claim a 9 amp continuous discharge rate.

    The older AW IMR14500 600mAh batteries were only a 4 amp continuous.
  14. kiba's Avatar
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    i;m playing ESO and archeage now, so nvm. you .......*rs dont like having fun, it seems
  15. bittermelon's Avatar
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    Hi Bad,

    what's the amp limit for my AW IMR 14500 3.7V 600mAh? Using for powering my REO Mini (original). Thanks.
  16. RocketPuppy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darryl Licht
    That was a perfect short sweet and to the point read for a DIY newb considering this next step in the evolution of vaping! Thanks a million!!!
    Excellent! Glad you found it usefull!
  17. Fernand's Avatar
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    The latest toxicology testing on Acetoin reveals that it's not toxic by inhalation like Diacetyl and Acetylpropionyl. Chemically it's the diketones that are associates with damage to the respiratory tract, and Acetoin is not a diketone.
  18. priorities's Avatar
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    ~Be Safe~Be Well~ *Always in my thoughts and prayers*...ever grateful to you and yours*..to our allies*...Bless you all.....* {{{hugs}}

  19. desertlover's Avatar
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    I have finally found someone who understands me.......The Ocelot. I started dripping with my first e-cig in 2011 and STILL use 510 atomizers.......like the prices much better these days as most people moved on. I am loving this blog!

    desertlover
  20. Baditude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heyjohn
    Right now, I'm using twin Samsung pink batteries ("eVic compatible"), but I'm also using commercial coils of 1.6+ ohms. However, I have a few RBAs ready to build, and will probably create some 0.5-1.0 ohm coils. I know that 20A of battery would get me to 0.8 ohm -- but I've no idea how the dual battery setup affects things. Any advice?
    First of all, I'm pretty sure that those pink Samsungs are ICR batteries (not high drain or safe chemistry), and will have only 3 - 4 amps continuous discharge (not enough amperage for safe sub-ohm use). You'll need at least a 20 amp continuous IMR battery for sub-ohms.

    The light blue Samsung 25R are IMR chemistry, high drain, safe chemistry, and 20 amps continuous discharge.

    Stacking batteries only doubles the voltage output, not the mAh or amperage output.
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