First poly clay drip tip
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  1. #1
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    Default First poly clay drip tip

    Used fimo polymer clay. This is first one I finished that works, fits. Used a n exacto knife and a drill like a mini lathe. Solid color so if I messed up I could mash up and start over, which I did several times.

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    Registered Supplier - Offline ECF Veteran pdib's Avatar
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    cool! does it shrink at all when you bake it?

    did you shape first, then bake? Or visey-versa?

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    I shaped then baked. Tried bake then shape first. Disdnt work very well. Too tough. Would probably require a real lathe and tools then. I did not notice any shrinkage at all.

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    Very cool!! Wish I had a lathe

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    Nice job! Are you going to glaze it? All I can think of is the mug I made in high school ceramics class.

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    What type of plasticizer does your poly clay contain? Working in thermoplastics, I'd be worried about plasticizer leaching.
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    I'm not sure. It is fimo soft polymer clay. I haven't actually used it yet because I hadn't put an o ring on it. Says its non toxic, but interactions with anything in the juice I'm not sure of, so I think it will remain as just the "hey look what I made" tip.

    Was thinking of making more and "glazing" them. But couldn't find anything on polymer clay craft sites for coating it that wasn't just as sketchy. Probably a reason most are metal or acrylic.

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  8. #8
    PV Master ECF Veteran stevegmu's Avatar
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    I wouldn't use it. I'd just get some standard clay-


    Polymer clays are a form of modeling clay that have become popular in recent years among children, adolescents and adult craftspeople. They are inexpensive, come in a variety of colors, are soft at room temperature, can be molded by hand into small or large items, and can be baked in a conventional oven at low heat, resulting in a permanent hard object. Fimo and Sculpey are the most common brand names of polymer clays in the U.S., but other different product lines exist. Unfortunately, these clays contain polyvinyl chloride (PVC) mixed with phthalate (pronounced tha- late) plasticizers. While the phthalate plasticizers make the clay soft and workable, they are also associated with potential health risks. Phthalates as a class of chemicals have been implicated in birth defects, reproductive problems, nerve system damage and other negative health effects.

    VPIRG’s research indicates that children and adults using polymer clays may be exposed to phthalates at harmful levels. Even when clays are prepared following proper package directions, children and adults can breathe or ingest high levels of phthalates. In addition to phthalate exposure the research indicates that when polymer clay is overheated enough or accidentally burned, the PVC will break down and release highly toxic hydrochloric acid gas.

    The potential for exposure to phthalates from normal use of polymer clays is troubling given the popularity of the clays both at home and at schools, the inadequacy of consumer warnings about the effects of these chemicals, and the effects phthalates may have on children. Moreover, since the Federal Toxic Substances Control Act does not require pre-market testing for new industrial chemicals, and because it is difficult to restrict the use of existing chemicals in commercial products, exposure to phthalates is cause for concern. VPIRG recommends that consumers avoid using polymer clays and calls on the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) to recall or suspend sale of polymer clays until they are shown to be safe for use by children and pregnant women. If the products remain on the market – VPIRG calls on manufacturers to provide adequate warnings to consumers as to why they should avoid use of the products or take special precautions when using them. Finally, state Attorneys General should investigate the claims by manufacturers that the clays are “non-toxic.”

    Health Risks of Phthalates

    Phthalates are associated with a diversity of negative health impacts including reproductive defects, birth deformities, liver and thyroid damage, neurological impacts as well as miscarriages. At least one phthalate is listed as an EPA probable human carcinogen. The following list illustrates the health risks of some different phthalates:

    DnOP (Di n Octyl Phthalate) – Birth deformities, reproductive disorders, liver and thyroid impacts, and linked to gene mutation in mixture with other compounds.
    DnHP (Di n Hexyl Phthalate) – Reproductive disorders, liver and thyroid impacts, linked to gene mutation in mixture with other compounds.
    BBP (Butyl Benzyl Phthalate) – Reproductive Disorders, birth deformities, suspected carcinogen, but studies inconclusive, and links to nerve disorders and miscarriages.
    DEHP ((2 ethylhexyl) Phthalate) – birth deformities, reproductive disorders, EPA “probable human carcinogen”, Dept. of Health and Human Services “Potential Human Carcinogen”, liver, kidney and thyroid impacts.
    DINP (Di isononyl phthalate) – Reproductive disorders and developmental harm.
    DEHT (Di (2 ethylhexyl) terphthalate) – Unknown Inadequate Research and Information about Phthalates
    Hidden HAZARDS Health Impacts of Toxins in Polymer Clays [Executive Summary and References] VPIRG Jul02


    Of all crap I breath in at work- PVC, Vinyl, Pollys, Urethane, Nylons, etc, it is the plasticizers that worry me, although once someone put PVC tooling in the cooker, setting off the hydrochloric acid gas alarm causing an immediate evacuation...

  9. #9
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    Fimo was refomulated in 2006 to remove pthlalates. I did read that when I was poking around. Still think the make my own drip tip fad has wore off anyhow lol.

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  10. #10
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    shopping.jpg Heres what I use...

    I could only find it online. NO stores in my area sold it. A small can was about 15.00, and it's great stuff. I gloss all my clay sculptures with it. Is it safe to use as a gloss for a tip? I don't know. I probably would.


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