Blood Tests...Does E-Cig Nicotine Show Up?
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Thread: Blood Tests...Does E-Cig Nicotine Show Up?

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    Senior Member ECF Veteran DawnOfTheDez's Avatar
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    Question Blood Tests...Does E-Cig Nicotine Show Up?

    My company's Wellness Progam now offers lower health insurance premiums if you take a blood test to show that you are not a TOBACCO user. This may be a DUMB question, but if I blood test as an Ecig user, will Nicotine show up in my blood test? I just don't see how they could test to see if tobacco is in your system without testing for nicotine...anyone come across anything like this?

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    I would ask what it is they're looking for specifically. What about the gum, or nicotine patches? You wouldn't be a "tobacco user"
    under those circumstances, but if i had to bet on it, i would think they're looking for nicotine. As far as it showing up in your blood I would guess, (guess being the operative word) that it would show up. You are taking nicotine in to your system, while it may not be as quickly absorbed as a cigarette, it is absorbed.

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    Yes, it will show up. The test is almost always for cotinine, a nicotine metabolite.

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    Super Member ECF Veteran Southern Gent's Avatar
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    Wasn't there someone here who actually requested the test be done and the continine levels were very low?

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    If you decided to vape 0mg juice before the test, how long would it take to clear out traces of nicotine use?

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    I spoke to my insurance agent about this. There are some companies out there that differentiate nicotine and tobacco, ecig, chew, etc. You need to ask the underwriter if they do or not.

    Good luck.

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    If you were a heavy smoker and also a heavy vaper, then traces of nicotine can be detected in your blood for up to 10 days or more after you've stopped your intake of nicotine.

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    Senior Member ECF Veteran DawnOfTheDez's Avatar
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    Hey thanks for the feedback everyone...I am also curious as to how long it would take to clear out of my system vaping on 0mg...

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    Super Member ECF Veteran Crumpet's Avatar
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    Ask for the breath test which can test for smoke.

    I'm just about through with these ignorant MFers that don't distinguish between smoking and other forms of nicotine useage.
    Quit Or Die Is A Lie!
    Facts, NOT Fear!

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    The half-life of nicotine is around 2 hours, and it takes approximately 5-7 half lives to reach a steady state. This concept is used more for reaching the ideal blood concentrations for medication to have their optimal effect, but it can also be applied to figuring out how long it takes to rid the body of a given substance. Keep in mind though that the higher the starting blood concentration, the longer it will take to clear it from your system (pretty common sense there).

    Also, you have to remember that with all laboratory instruments, there is a specific limit of detection for any compound that you are analyzing. It will vary from substance to substance. At present, the limit of detection for nicotine is 5g/L (5 x 10^-6 g/L). The limit of detection for continine is 100ng/L (1 x 10^-7 g/L). That means that even an infinitesimally small amount of nicotine/continine in the blood can be detected.

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