Which statistic is correct?
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: Which statistic is correct?

  1. #1
    Super Member ECF Veteran
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    harlingen,texas
    Posts
    603
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Which statistic is correct?

    In last weeks" WSJ,there was a small article on "Kicking the Habit". It was written by Sarah Slobin and the source was CDC Office of the Surgeon General; Stephan Hess,James M. McPherson(Lincoln). The small text is as follows: Chances after 6 months a smoker will have quit using these methods alone: Chantix 33.2%,Nasal Spray 26.7%,Patch 26.5%, Gum 26.1%,inhaler 24.8%.

    The figures we use are quite different. What are the correct figures and what source can we quote to back up our stats?

  2. #2
    Super Member ECF Veteran
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NJ, USA
    Posts
    402

    Default

    Not sure about the actual stats themselves (Wikipedia may be a good place to look), but I do know that the standard benchmark is 1 year, not 6 months. It's no surprise that pharmaceutical companies would want to use 6 months in their press releases and advertisements though.

  3. #3
    PV Master Verified Member
    ECF Veteran
    Supporting Member
    rothenbj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Green Lane, Pa
    Posts
    6,181

    Default

    Even at six months, those numbers appear awfully high. This article may help-

    Chantix Helps Smokers Kick Habit

    Taking a controlled group of pack a day smokers that smoked about 24 years they showed

    The four-week continuous quit rates for the various treatments were:

    48% for 1 mg Chantix twice daily
    37% for 1 mg Chantix daily
    33% for Zyban
    17% for the placebo

    Then at 1 year Chantix was down to 14% against 5% placebo so you can sell that as the smoker being three times as likely to quit over a cold turkey approach or a smoker has a nine percent better chance of quiting with Chantix than a cold turkey attempt. The second survey they looked at arrived at a one year rate between 19 and 22%, depending on dosage method as opposed to 4% in the placebo group.

    Obviously we know nothing about the type smokers that took part in the second study. The other NRT solutions can't possibly be accurate based on my experience and exposure to people that have tried these methods. The real test is at least a year and I'd go so far as looking at 2 and 5 year quit rates. When you consider that the number of smokers hasn't really fallen off much over the last five years, those numbers really look silly IMHO.

  4. #4
    Supplier Associate ECF Veteran keelalagirl55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The pup cave
    Posts
    26,240

    Default

    Well...their 6 month rates may be correct as I myself have tried to quit 4 different times with medication...well...obviously since it was more than once it did not work, but it did last for at least 4-6 months....lol....I would like to know the start back rate of those that quit after 6 months.....and what do they define as quitting? Does that mean that they did have a significant time where they did not smoke regardless of whether they started back up again or not?

  5. #5
    Super Member ECF Veteran
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    harlingen,texas
    Posts
    603
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rothenbj View Post
    Even at six months, those numbers appear awfully high. This article may help-

    Chantix Helps Smokers Kick Habit

    Taking a controlled group of pack a day smokers that smoked about 24 years they showed

    The four-week continuous quit rates for the various treatments were:

    48% for 1 mg Chantix twice daily
    37% for 1 mg Chantix daily
    33% for Zyban
    17% for the placebo

    Then at 1 year Chantix was down to 14% against 5% placebo so you can sell that as the smoker being three times as likely to quit over a cold turkey approach or a smoker has a nine percent better chance of quiting with Chantix than a cold turkey attempt. The second survey they looked at arrived at a one year rate between 19 and 22%, depending on dosage method as opposed to 4% in the placebo group.

    Obviously we know nothing about the type smokers that took part in the second study. The other NRT solutions can't possibly be accurate based on my experience and exposure to people that have tried these methods. The real test is at least a year and I'd go so far as looking at 2 and 5 year quit rates. When you consider that the number of smokers hasn't really fallen off much over the last five years, those numbers really look silly IMHO.
    The numbers I have seen on the ECF have been much much lower. I will have to search for one of our comparison charts,but I seem to remember all the rates were under 10%. I have been quoting that number and I want to make sure that whatever I say is accurate. Thanks for your suggestions.

  6. #6
    Senior Member ECF Veteran Turnkeys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    SW Washington State
    Posts
    172

    Default

    I can't directly comment on Chantix as I've never tried it. When my GP suggested it, I recalled a previous quit attempt with Welbutrin. If I told my GP I was depressed, insurance would cover it. If I wanted the same 'script for a smoking cessation aide, I had to pay out of pocket. So at her wink/nod suggestion, we agreed I was feeling depressed.

    Since Chantix doesn't have a similar dual usage the same ruse wasn't an option. It was only later that I learned about the side effects, which I consider unacceptable.

  7. #7
    ECF Guru ECF Veteran mwa102464's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Outside of the Philadelphia Burbs, NJ & Fla
    Posts
    14,442

    Default

    That's all good, but then you also have to figure in the side effects of these meds like the worst nightmares you will ever have (chantex & the patch) compared to the ecig. I would love to take 100 smokers and put them on a really good ecig than put 100 on Chantix and another 100 on the patch or another med. Then check in a year later and see who the REAL WINNER IS...!!!
    I have no favorites I love them all, but the sexy chicks who sport wild thongs drive me up the wall ;-)
    Support the cause give to CASSA

  8. #8
    ECF Guru ECF Veteran mwa102464's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Outside of the Philadelphia Burbs, NJ & Fla
    Posts
    14,442

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Turnkeys View Post
    I can't directly comment on Chantix as I've never tried it. When my GP suggested it, I recalled a previous quit attempt with Welbutrin. If I told my GP I was depressed, insurance would cover it. If I wanted the same 'script for a smoking cessation aide, I had to pay out of pocket. So at her wink/nod suggestion, we agreed I was feeling depressed.

    Since Chantix doesn't have a similar dual usage the same ruse wasn't an option. It was only later that I learned about the side effects, which I consider unacceptable.
    MY POINT EXACTLY, as well as the ecig being the best to use to stop smoking cigs right away and even long term
    I have no favorites I love them all, but the sexy chicks who sport wild thongs drive me up the wall ;-)
    Support the cause give to CASSA

  9. #9
    Senior Member ECF Veteran Turnkeys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    SW Washington State
    Posts
    172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mwa102464 View Post
    the worst nightmares you will ever have (chantex & the patch) compared to the ecig.
    OMG No kidding!!!!

  10. #10
    PV Master Verified Member
    ECF Veteran
    Supporting Member
    rothenbj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Green Lane, Pa
    Posts
    6,181

    Default

    This study may shine a bit more light-

    Nicotine Replacement Therapy Modestly Boosts Long-term Success Rates for Smokers

    "Researchers from the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine in Switzerland identified all randomized placebo-controlled trials of NRT that lasted longer than 12 months. Twelve studies with an average follow-up of 4.3 years and a total of 4,792 participants (NRT: 2,408; placebo: 2,384) met the criteria for this meta-analysis. Three types of NRT were studied: patch (5 trials), gum (4), and nasal spray (3); each delivered about 1 mg of nicotine per hour. Participants used NRT for about three months and received counseling; the control groups only received counseling. The researchers, therefore, were able estimate the long-term effectiveness of NRT beyond the effect of counseling."

    "In both the treatment and placebo groups, 30% of volunteers relapsed after the 12-month point. NRT showed significant benefits in six of the 12 trials, and no benefit in the other six. But when all the data were combined and analyzed, NRT almost doubled the rate of successfully quitting beyond 12 months. However, since the rate of success was quite low, even a doubling of this rate meant success for only about 7% of the 2,408 participants receiving NRT in this meta-analysis."

    Basically, I read that to mean that the long term effectiveness of cold turkey is around 3.5% with traditional NRT long term success at 3.5% better success, still pretty ineffective. I'm sure Chantix has a better quit rate, but as posted, there are some serious consequences in using the drug. Also working backwards, based on the 30% relapse after one year, the average quit rate at one year would be around 10% for the NRT studied. So if the average of the Spray, Patch and Gum were 26.4% at six months, another 62% were lost between month 6 and one year.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks