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Thread: Why sub ohm

  1. #31
    Ultra Member ECF Veteran StarsAndBars's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomzgreat View Post
    Both Coils were brand new. The reason for the difference is the lower Gauge Wire is thicker and also covers more surface area.
    I had no agenda when shooting the Video except to see what a low Gauge and a High Gauge Wire would do at the same Ohm Level.

    I promise you no tricks played. The playing field was even.
    Totally man. Wasn't trying to imply that your video wasn't legit. Just because I don't understand something surely doesn't keep it from being so. Don't electrons travel at the speed of light? I just cant imagine that small difference in surface area would account for the difference in 'heat up' time.'

    Very interested in this though. I have been using 32 gauge exclusively and considering going to 30, so I'd like to get all the info I can about this.

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    I was using 32, but I've decided 30 works better for me. I use microcoils, and I use high resistance, compared to most that use RBA's. I believe it was in the beginning of this thread that I mentioned I've been using a 4.3 Ohm micro on my AGI.

    AWG 28: Low Resistance (0.44 ohms/inch)
    AWG 30: Low Resistance (0.70 ohms/ inch)
    AWG 32: Low - Standard Resistance (1.1 ohms/ inch)
    AWG 33: Low - Standard - High Resistance (1.39 ohms/inch)
    AWG 34: Standard - High Resistance (1.76 ohms/inch)

  3. #33
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    Now that I look into it, Tom is right. Larger gauge wire has a lower resistance, which means lower heat. This is because resistance is the cause of heat in an electrical circuit. But then again don't watts produce heat? Crap, still confused.

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    Watts/Power is the measurement of heat...not heat. The heat being produced is from the resistance and current flow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by suspectK View Post
    Watts/Power is the measurement of heat...not heat. The heat being produced is from the resistance and current flow.
    Good call, thanks man.
    jove likes this.

  6. #36
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    Here is an explanation.
    The lower Gauge wire was a 5 wrap, the Higher gauge a 2-1 wrap.

    The length of the wire was 2 1/2 times that of the other. The thickness of the wire is much thicker.

    They were both wrapped around a FC-2000 Porous Ceramic Wick 1/8, the wick absorbs heat 2 1/2 times the amount of wire was in touch with the wick, so much more surface space for the wick to absorb heat. And finally with 2 1/2 times the length we are talking triple the exposure to air, which again will dissipate heat.

    I'm sure if I did a 2-1 wrap with the low Gauge Kanthal it would have flared much higher than the high gauge Kanthal. But we weren't comparing how the Gauges react when the same length is used, we were comparing the same Ohm's created using low Gauge and High Gauge.
    Last edited by tomzgreat; 10-24-2013 at 09:32 PM.

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