Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345
Results 41 to 44 of 44
Like Tree71Likes

Thread: Pleas help! I spilled 100mg nic on my hand

  1. #41
    Super Member ECF Veteran
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Missouri, USA
    Posts
    388
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I've got it on my hands with no noticeable effects. As long as you wash it off right away and it isn't over a large area of skin you'll be fine.
    My biggest worry is dropping it or something an getting splashed all down the front of me. I open the bottle in the sink and don't pick it back up till the lid is on.

    100mg is 100mg/1ml

  2. #42
    Vape 4 Life Verified Member
    ECF Veteran
    Supporting Member
    Talyon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    2,960
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Sometimes we forget that 18ml nic is really 1.8% and 24 nic is 2.4% and 48 is 4.8% etc so 100ml nic is 10.0%.

  3. #43
    Member Lemerchand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Sacramento
    Posts
    9

    Default

    I'd say just a good wash should be fine. Don't let yourself get too worked up or you might placebo yourself.

  4. #44
    Full Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Nicotine is a weak base with a pKa of 8.0. In its ionized state, such as in acidic environments, nicotine does not rapidly cross membranes. In conventional smoking, nicotine reaches brain in 10-20 sec with a t1/2 of ca. 10 hr, but the kinetics of nicotine absorption are quite different as a function of route of administration. The LD50 of ca. 50 mg/kg applies to both rats and humans (one and the same in some instances), and such studies often involve chronic dosing of nicotine base over time. Recent studies have shown that toxicity in humans may be much greater than previously estimated. The nicotine poisoning study of Lockhart in 1933 indeed concluded absorption from skin in humans, and there is also evidence of toxicity in tobacco plant workers subjected to chronic exposure. However, absorption, pharmacology and toxicology are relative. It may be instructive that ~2 mg inhaled nicotine yields Cmax of 20-60 ng/ml within 3-5 min (!), whereas 21 mg nicotine exposure in a transdermal patch reaches lower nicotine levels in blood (<20 ng/ml) in a substantially longer period of time (~10 hr). I absolutely agree with your guiding principles on safety, especially since skin exposure i.e., skin patches ranging from 10-20 mg is known to cause rashes and allergic reactions. Accordingly, it appears that a single acute skin exposure especially in the absence of adverse events (dizziness, nausea, vomiting) does not represent the same risk as exposure via other routes e.g., oral, sublingual, intranasal, pulmonary).

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •