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Thread: CHIT CHAT in VOLTVILLE

  1. #37891
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    Quote Originally Posted by SandySu View Post
    True, but I'd call boredom an unhappy state, so it'd make me restless, thus creative.
    When I get bored I scour Google images for something cool to draw. That cures the boredom and gets me excited about starting a new drawing, thus creative and excited. LOL!
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmcase View Post
    Ok Sandy, you wanted to see a drawing, here is a quicky sketch of your raindrop.

    Quote Originally Posted by tmcase View Post
    When I get bored I scour Google images for something cool to draw. That cures the boredom and gets me excited about starting a new drawing, thus creative and excited. LOL!

    Or - Stay with doing a drawing of Sandy's Photos - This is beautifully done . . . Just Sayin' . . .
    rave, tmcase, SandySu and 1 others like this.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle View Post
    AND - For Some people that is exactly what they need to feel to do some of their artwork . . The more emotional they are the more emotional and brilliant (IMO) their artwork is too . . . Just as an example - look at any of the later works by Vincent van Gogh and compair them to the ones he started producing in the begining of his career . . .
    Quote Originally Posted by SandySu View Post
    This article was full of science-speak, and I found it practically incomprehensible. But I persisted, and got through it.

    I think at times of stress and upheaval in my life, I've felt more of a creative urge. I think at times when I'm very content, I don't feel restless enough to be creative. I guess too much stress could hinder creativity, but a little disturbance is probably stimulating. Just MHO.
    There is no greater motivation for great art than the need to express emotion - both negative and positive. The stronger the emotion, the more powerful the need to vomit it up and get it out of your system. I'm going to quote my own blog, because frankly, I'm too darned lazy to try to put it all into words again:

    "Humans need an expressive outlet. Their heads are full of alternating shadows and rainbows. They need to reach out to other humans to share whatever powerful thoughts are in possession of them or they will lose their seat at the helm. Most humans talk. This is the simplest, most direct form of expression. There are many others who speak a different language. A musician may think in the language of melody. An artist thinks and expresses visually. If you seek to understand the artist you need to look beyond the obvious forms on the canvas to look within those shapes and colors. The alligator is more than an alligator. The wood duck is more than a wood duck. If they are simply animals represented by brush strokes on a canvas, then the painting will be flat, lifeless, and without a soul.

    When I painted “See Ya Later, Alligator” it was when my body and mind were being first attacked by multiple sclerosis. I had no idea what was happening to me and was absolutely terrified by the malevolent monster that came from out of nowhere and was attempting to destroy me – to devour me. There was only raw fear and the desperate attempt to fight for my life. The wood duck had to set its mind to the ultimate goal of escape."


    (If this shows up as small, click on the thumbnail for a larger image)


    That painting, born of absolute fear and dread, is my favorite of all time. But the same wave of emotion that sprang from this undefined attack gave birth to a whole series of "scared spitless" paintings which are some of my very best. The last. "Hot Pursuit", won Best of Show" at the very last wildlife show that I was able to participate in.

    (If this shows up as small, click on the thumbnail for a larger image)


    Soon after, I had my diagnosis and from that "little bump in the road", I created "Facing Her Own Reflection" to express what I was dealing with internally at that time:

    (If this shows up as small, click on the thumbnail for a larger image)


    My apologies to those of you that have already seen these (possibly ad nauseum).

    So ... in my opinion, when artists use their art to express intense emotion rather than as a simple means to produce income, their art will be much more powerful when created while either stressed or euphoric.
    marlou, tmcase, Uncle and 5 others like this.

  4. #37894
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    Quote Originally Posted by rave View Post
    So ... in my opinion, when artists use their art to express intense emotion rather than as a simple means to produce income, their art will be much more powerful when created while either stressed or euphoric.
    So true. That put me in a difficult place. I had to achieve a balance in my writing, since non-fiction requires more objectivity. Fear of harsh criticism, or even retribution made it difficult to express myself. Using my work to discharge my anger, rather than having publication and $$$ kept me going. Finally, I got to a place where I was more sure of myself, the anger went away, the fear dwindled, then I had to face motivational problems. Losing the internet for a few days helped!! Having a picture of Alexander Solzhenitsyn above my desk helps, too.

    Anyway, I have work to do. I know exactly what I have to do, and it is boring, so I'll turn my music on.

    Oh-- by the way, those pictures are beautiful, and a very good illustration of what you were talking about.
    Last edited by 0mg Meniere; 01-15-2014 at 12:22 PM.
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  5. #37895
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    Quote Originally Posted by rave View Post
    There is no greater motivation for great art than the need to express emotion - both negative and positive. The stronger the emotion, the more powerful the need to vomit it up and get it out of your system. I'm going to quote my own blog, because frankly, I'm too darned lazy to try to put it all into words again:

    "Humans need an expressive outlet. Their heads are full of alternating shadows and rainbows. They need to reach out to other humans to share whatever powerful thoughts are in possession of them or they will lose their seat at the helm. Most humans talk. This is the simplest, most direct form of expression. There are many others who speak a different language. A musician may think in the language of melody. An artist thinks and expresses visually. If you seek to understand the artist you need to look beyond the obvious forms on the canvas to look within those shapes and colors. The alligator is more than an alligator. The wood duck is more than a wood duck. If they are simply animals represented by brush strokes on a canvas, then the painting will be flat, lifeless, and without a soul.

    When I painted “See Ya Later, Alligator” it was when my body and mind were being first attacked by multiple sclerosis. I had no idea what was happening to me and was absolutely terrified by the malevolent monster that came from out of nowhere and was attempting to destroy me – to devour me. There was only raw fear and the desperate attempt to fight for my life. The wood duck had to set its mind to the ultimate goal of escape."


    (If this shows up as small, click on the thumbnail for a larger image)


    That painting, born of absolute fear and dread, is my favorite of all time. But the same wave of emotion that sprang from this undefined attack gave birth to a whole series of "scared spitless" paintings which are some of my very best. The last. "Hot Pursuit", won Best of Show" at the very last wildlife show that I was able to participate in.

    (If this shows up as small, click on the thumbnail for a larger image)


    Soon after, I had my diagnosis and from that "little bump in the road", I created "Facing Her Own Reflection" to express what I was dealing with internally at that time:

    (If this shows up as small, click on the thumbnail for a larger image)


    My apologies to those of you that have already seen these (possibly ad nauseum).

    So ... in my opinion, when artists use their art to express intense emotion rather than as a simple means to produce income, their art will be much more powerful when created while either stressed or euphoric.
    I guess we're in agreement, then, that some sort of unrest can motivate the best art. I suppose this is hard for scientists to measure, but those of us who feel a creative urge know it from experience. The fear you felt certainly lends dynamics to your paintings. I especially like the wood duck and alligator. Why? Maybe it's because I see the action and the threat, but it also looks to me like the duck will escape. Thanks for sharing, Rave.
    rave, tmcase, Uncle and 1 others like this.

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    Good morning Volties. I found a bag of delicious Christmas blend coffee in the pantry. Nom, nom.

    Thank you for sharing, Raven.

    Interesting discussion on personality types.

    I found living in the city and the suburbs really stressful. Living in the country is a lot of work but it does suit me. I always think I should try harder to have friends but apparently I am just not a friends person. I just don't like most people. I do have some exceptions

    I got the trainer over to the house and he helped me figure out the breeching on the horse. He may have a small bridle and a longer belly band. I'll save a bunch of money and since I'll still need to get a harness for Nevada, that works for me. He was very impressed by little Wiseguy who behaved very nicely while we messed around with the breeching and put all the harness pieces on him. I am also pleased that I have been doing pretty good with setting up the cart. The trainer also thought I had two fine looking horses

    Hubby was home since he had a cold so I asked the trainer if he would mind taking a look at how we are doing with Nevada. He helped Hubby get the stud chain on him and then observed while Hubby took the horse out to the round pen. Hubby took the horse over some logs and then ran him around the round pen. The trainer thought we were doing good with Nevada. We discussed Nevada's issues and making sure we use the stud chain so Nevada doesn't get into the habit of being a pill. The trainer thought Nevada will make a great cart horse so that is good. Nevada isn't troubled or worried, he has confidence. That is what I have been thinking - if we can make sure Nevada listens to us and says "Okay, you are the boss" he should be great pulling a cart.

    We are going over to the trainer's place on Saturday so we can see his chariot and meet his critters and pick up that bridle and belly band. Then, I am scheduled for the next Tuesday for some ground driving or cart work. Can't wait.

    I seem to have the cold. I just hope it doesn't get any worse than this. Since I already had a cold this year, I think that this is terribly unfair. I have a cleaning job on Friday so let's cross our fingers that I will be well enough to do that cleaning job.
    Last edited by Renolizzie; 01-15-2014 at 01:33 PM.
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    Since I already had a cold this year, I think that this is terribly unfair.
    Maybe it will be milder. Could it be triggered by dust from cleaning the animals' living areas? Do you wear a mask?
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    Quote Originally Posted by 0mg Meniere View Post
    Maybe it will be milder. Could it be triggered by dust from cleaning the animals' living areas? Do you wear a mask?
    Nope, Hubby just had a cold and now I have it. It isn't dust. Hopefully, it will be the mild version since I already had a cold early in the fall. I got the flu shot, too, which I don't always. I just hate being sick and I have a whole list of things that aren't getting done but the good news is that Hubby will be bringing Chinese home for dinner. No cooking and no dishes
    rave, tmcase, SandySu and 2 others like this.

  9. #37899
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    Quote Originally Posted by 0mg Meniere View Post
    So true. That put me in a difficult place. I had to achieve a balance in my writing, since non-fiction requires more objectivity. Fear of harsh criticism, or even retribution made it difficult to express myself. Using my work to discharge my anger, rather than having publication and $$$ kept me going. Finally, I got to a place where I was more sure of myself, the anger went away, the fear dwindled, then I had to face motivational problems. Losing the internet for a few days helped!! Having a picture of Alexander Solzhenitsyn above my desk helps, too.

    Anyway, I have work to do. I know exactly what I have to do, and it is boring, so I'll turn my music on.

    Oh-- by the way, those pictures are beautiful, and a very good illustration of what you were talking about.
    0mg, I agree that nonfiction writing is a lot different than fiction because you are supposed to suppress emotion and look at the subject objectively. That can make it harder to express passion. I suppose there has to be a certain passion for the thing in question to keep you going, but it's not passion like anger or fear; it's more like intense interest and curiosity. I find I have this kind of passion short-term, to find something out, but not for long enough to write a whole book about anything. I admire your fortitude.

    Also, remember that most writers have points where they get stalled, and they have a number of ways of dealing with that. You could set it down for a while and go back to it when you feel a fresh enthusiasm, but then you might set it down for too long. Another strategy is to make yourself write something each day, even if what you write will wind up in the trash. Sometimes you can just push through the roadblock. I hope you find a solution so you can continue to work on your book.

    Speaking of stalling, I think I'm finished with that other version of Maija. I took a break for a while, because I was sort of exhausted after all the pre-Christmas frenzy of doing horse portraits. I suppose that I was engaged in what Rave termed "a simple means to produce income, their art will be much more powerful when created while either stressed or euphoric." I was just cranking them out to get them done for Deb in time. At first, that wasn't so bad, but by the end, it was starting to wear on me. I still tried to put some emotion of the beauty of a horse into them, but calling that up to produce by a deadline was hard. Drawing from a photo that didn't inspire me was extra hard, too. But it sure is nice to have Maija off the to-do list.

    It sounds, 0mg, as if you are determined enough to get it done. Determination is an emotion, too. It calls up its own kind of motivation. Maybe the work isn't as inspired as that from more pure passions, like anger and fear, but who's to say? I wish you the best of luck (though luck really doesn't enter into it; it's talent) getting it done and published.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renolizzie View Post
    Good morning Volties. I found a bag of delicious Christmas blend coffee in the pantry. Nom, nom.

    Thank you for sharing, Raven.

    Interesting discussion on personality types.

    I fiound living in the city and the suburbs really stressful. Living in the country is a lot of work but it does suit me. I always think I should try harder to have friends but apparently I am just not a friends person. I just don't like most people. I do have some exceptions

    I got the trainer over to the house and he helped me figure out the breeching on the horse. He may have a small bridle and a longer belly band. I'll save a bunch of money and since I'll still need to get a harness for Nevada, that works for me. He was very impressed by little Wiseguy who behaved very nicely while we messed around with the breeching and put all the harness pieces on him. I am also pleased that I have been doing pretty good with setting up the cart. The trainer also thought I had two fine looking horses

    Hubby was home since he had a cold so I asked the trainer if he would mind taking a look at how we are doing with Nevada. He helped Hubby get the stud chain on him and then observed while Hubby took the horse out to the round pen. Hubby took the horse over some logs and then ran him around the round pen. The trainer thought we were doing good with Nevada. We discussed Nevada's issues and making sure we use the stud chain so Nevada doesn't get into the habit of being a pill. The trainer thought Nevada will make a great cart horse so that is good. Nevada isn't troubled or worried, he has confidence. That is what I have been thinking - if we can make sure Nevada listens to us and says "Okay, you are the boss" he should be great pulling a cart.

    We are going over to the trainer's place on Saturday so we can see his chariot and meet his critters and pick up that bridle and belly band. Then, I am scheduled for the next Tuesday for some ground driving or cart work. Can't wait.

    I seem to have the cold. I just hope it doesn't get any worse than this. Since I already had a cold this year, I think that this is terribly unfair. I have a cleaning job on Friday so let's cross our fingers that I will be well enough to do that cleaning job.
    Lizzie, thanks for telling us about the trainer's visit. I was thinking of you and wondering how it went. Keep us posted on your lessons with him.
    rave, tmcase, Renolizzie and 1 others like this.

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