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  1. #21
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    Definately here to learn, thanks for giving me somewhere to start 😁

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Kurz View Post
    I'm fairly new to rebuildables, and I love what I'm getting out of them so far. I haven't ventured into sub ohm setups, I'm quite happy with a 1.2 ohm single or dual coil setup. I don't understand the appeal of an unstable sub ohm set up that could potentially hurt oneself when you can operate at a safer resistance and simply up the voltage/ wattage.... Is there a significant enough difference in performance to risk injury if something were to go wrong? Why use a mechanical and run it at .2 ohms (or whatever) when you can use a 1.5 ohm coil on a provari or a dna20 or a vamo (or whatever) increase the output of the device, AND have the protection of the device? I've seen videos by riptrippers where he's getting vapor production equal to that of a mechanical sub ohm setup but he's at 15-18 watts on a coil that's not sub ohm, and it's much safer. Am I missing something here?

    Also, it seems to me (based ignorantly and entirely on common sense) that in such a scenario of catastrophic failure resulting in a battery actually causing bodily harm, wouldn't it heat up sufficiently enough to warn the user? I feel like you would drop a superheated mod rather than grasp it, continue to vape, and blow your face off... Or is there something else that I should know?
    I have asked this question myself. But who knows, we may not know what we are missing. I will try it one of these days (so I can see and know for myself), but we must make sure we understand what we are doing, as with anything.

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  3. #23
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    I think it's great that we don't all have to like the same things, but I also think that sub ohm is just one phase in finding out what you do/don't like. There are a lot of folks (like me) that have tried sub ohm, and just decided that it wasn't our thing. This 2.1 ohm coil that I'm using right now vapes just fine at a lowly 3.8v which is only 6.87 watts. But, just because I like it, doesn't mean that you have to.

    How you do the build is what determines what resistance is proper.
    Last edited by tj99959; 10-21-2013 at 05:00 PM.
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    What other resources do you all recommend to learn more about sub ohming

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    I'll answer the question, why sub ohm.

    It's all about the Gauge of the wire. For Sub Ohm Vaping lower Gauge Wire is used. The lower gauge at least when wrapped at least a 4-3 wrap heats up slower than the Higher Gauge Wire and often tops out at a lower temperature.

    I've found that Sub Ohm Vaping is a smoother vape for this reason.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tomzgreat View Post
    I'll answer the question, why sub ohm.

    It's all about the Gauge of the wire. For Sub Ohm Vaping lower Gauge Wire is used. The lower gauge at least when wrapped at least a 4-3 wrap heats up slower than the Higher Gauge Wire and often tops out at a lower temperature.

    I've found that Sub Ohm Vaping is a smoother vape for this reason.
    This sounds backwards. Lower resistance means higher power means faster vaporization. I thought one of the reasons you need large air holes on sub ohm because you need increased airflow to cool the vape down because it burns hotter

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Kurz View Post
    This sounds backwards. Lower resistance means higher power means faster vaporization. I thought one of the reasons you need large air holes on sub ohm because you need increased airflow to cool the vape down because it burns hotter
    Seeing is believing

    http://www.e-cigarette-forum.com/for...up-faster.html

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    Thanks for posting the videos! I've just seen it and still not sure I believe it. I think other factors may be proximity of one coil to the next, and amount of gunk build up on the coils. I think I remember you mentioning that you dry burned the coils prior to the video, but would submit using new coils may give more conclusive results.

    Trying to wrap my brain around this now and don't understand why they wouldn't heat at the same rate all factors (except gauge) being exactly equal.

    I always thought the benefit of smaller gauge (larger wire) was less resistance, hence you can squeeze an extra coil into the wrap (gaining a small amount of heat and surface area). Now I'm not sure what I think.

  9. #29
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    The more surface area, the more heat distribution, the slower the wire heats up. The benefit to lower gauges is lower resistance + surface area. Not only can you build larger coils, but smaller coils function better and last longer than higher gauge coils.
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    Quote Originally Posted by StarsAndBars View Post
    Thanks for posting the videos! I've just seen it and still not sure I believe it. I think other factors may be proximity of one coil to the next, and amount of gunk build up on the coils. I think I remember you mentioning that you dry burned the coils prior to the video, but would submit using new coils may give more conclusive results.

    Trying to wrap my brain around this now and don't understand why they wouldn't heat at the same rate all factors (except gauge) being exactly equal.

    I always thought the benefit of smaller gauge (larger wire) was less resistance, hence you can squeeze an extra coil into the wrap (gaining a small amount of heat and surface area). Now I'm not sure what I think.
    Both Coils were brand new. The reason for the difference is the lower Gauge Wire is thicker and also covers more surface area.
    I had no agenda when shooting the Video except to see what a low Gauge and a High Gauge Wire would do at the same Ohm Level.

    I promise you no tricks played. The playing field was even.

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