Inside Super T, making of an adapter
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Thread: Inside Super T, making of an adapter

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    Forum Supplier ECF Veteran forcedfuel50's Avatar
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    Default Inside Super T, making of an adapter

    Just thought i'd share the making of a Super T 801 & 901 adapter and button machined from solid core aluminum. These pictures are no where inclusive of all the steps and leave out the hundreds of times i am checking dimensions and switching tools throughout the machining process, but it still gives you a feel for the in depth process that even a simple adapter takes here at Super-T.
    The first picture is of the finished 801, 901 and button as they came hot off the machine yesterday morning before even being polished. If any other manufacturer tries to tell you that gouges, deep machine marks, pitting, dents, ridges and blemishes are the result of being handmade or are artwork, this is simply not true as they are the result of incompetent machining including dull tools, mis-aligned tools, carelessness, lack of machining knowledge fundamentals, inferior equipment and an overall lack of any quality control as no competent machinist would ever let such inferior work leave their shop. I know I wouldn't!
    I hope you enjoy the pictures. Just one 801 adjustable airflow adapter takes around 4 hours to machine!


    Cutting the stock

    Turning, facing

    Knurling



    Drilling

    Checking the runout


    Ready to be threaded

    Threading

    And lastly, the BUFF!! Watch your hands and clothing around that bad boy!!!
    My dad made that buffer; he was quite the talented machinist! Someday i hope to have the skills he had....rest in peace dad.
    Last edited by forcedfuel50; 04-28-2014 at 04:19 PM.
    Torqueguy likes this.

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    Wow David... very impressive!

    I was trying to imagine that could be my very own Super T "baby" being created... but really don't know where I am on the list...and I'm trying very hard to be patient!

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    A home-made buffer mounted next to a hand-loader... Looks like my basement from 20 years ago...

    Nice pics and info!

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    Beautiful work , David.
    This is why we are all waiting patiently.
    Great artisan !

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    Super Member ECF Veteran Nforcer's Avatar
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    indeed amazing tools David

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    Forum Supplier ECF Veteran forcedfuel50's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mixxy View Post
    Wow David... very impressive!

    I was trying to imagine that could be my very own Super T "baby" being created... but really don't know where I am on the list...and I'm trying very hard to be patient!
    You are "11" on the waiting list of the third batch, which i should be starting here in a few days. I rough machine all the bodies together and then break them out one by one to do the adapters and sleeves.

    Thank you everyone for the compliments, i thought you may like to see how it goes from a chunk of metal into a functional piece.

    David

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    Quote Originally Posted by forcedfuel50 View Post
    You are "11" on the waiting list of the third batch, which i should be starting here in a few days.
    Man, I hope that I'm not #13!!

    Or worse... like #37... argh...

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    Full Member WytNyt's Avatar
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    Thnx for the pics. I was holding my super-t up to the pics you put up and I swear the pics are close to 3 or 4 times bigger that the actual product!! How you see what you are doing is truley amazing!! I just love my super-t, thnx again for the awsome job you did!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by forcedfuel50 View Post
    You are "11" on the waiting list of the third batch, which i should be starting here in a few days. I rough machine all the bodies together and then break them out one by one to do the adapters and sleeves.

    Thank you everyone for the compliments, i thought you may like to see how it goes from a chunk of metal into a functional piece.

    David
    Thanks for letting me know where I am on the list!

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    Quote Originally Posted by forcedfuel50 View Post
    Just thought i'd share the making of a Super T 801 & 901 adapter and button machined from solid core aluminum. These pictures are no where inclusive of all the steps and leave out the hundreds of times i am checking dimensions and switching tools throughout the machining process, but it still gives you a feel for the in depth process that even a simple adapter takes here at Super-T.
    The first picture is of the finished 801, 901 and button as they came hot off the machine yesterday morning before even being polished. If any other manufacturer tries to tell you that gouges, deep machine marks, pitting, dents, ridges and blemishes are the result of being handmade or are artwork, this is simply not true as they are the result of incompetent machining including dull tools, mis-aligned tools, carelessness, lack of machining knowledge fundamentals, inferior equipment and an overall lack of any quality control as no competent machinist would ever let such inferior work leave their shop. I know I wouldn't!
    I hope you enjoy the pictures. Just one 801 adjustable airflow adapter takes around 4 hours to machine!


    Cutting the stock

    Turning, facing

    Knurling



    Drilling

    Checking the runout


    Ready to be threaded

    Threading

    And lastly, the BUFF!! Watch your hands and clothing around that bad boy!!!
    My dad made that buffer; he was quite the talented machinist! Someday i hope to have the skills he had....rest in peace dad.
    May he rest in peace and god bless all your family my friend, keep up your
    works of art!

    and for everyone waiting, TRUST ME, WORTH THE WAIT!
    Last edited by truelove; 10-22-2009 at 06:20 AM.

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