Cigarettes; addictive chemicals?

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oldtechno

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When I originally got e-cigs, I did so with the idea in mind of quiting them after a month and a half to two months--basically that's this week. I had quit smoke once for ten years and I haven't forgotten the drill.

--THEN--

...I remembered nicotine isn't the only addictive additive in cigarettes. I remembered hear on the news one night, years ago, there were five or six addictive chemicals in cigarettes. I remember; nicotine is what bothers us for the first two months. Then, four months later, another chemical starts on us...eight months still another...One year and a half yet 'another' starts bothering us to smoke again...finally, ten years later the last one starts up (that's the one that got me).

Now, because of this memory, I've decided to extend my e-cig usage to just above one year and a half.

So, my question is...does anyone remember that same information? Five or six additive chemicals...two months, four months, eight months, one and a half years and ten years?8-o
 

Pav

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Check out the movie "The Insider" about the scientist turned whistleblower on big tobacco named Jeffrey Wigand. True story. I'm no chemist so I don't really have time to read thousands of docs regarding the chemical content of cigarettes, but this movie made it clear that in the legal case he disclosed the info that cigarettes have tons of nicotene enhancers in them.
 

cluster

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Oct 12, 2009
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Sounds really, really far fetched. I can believe the nicotine enhancers, though hollywood movies are not always the very best scientific resources around (?)

By having legal drugs and illegal drugs so neatly separated in the public mind, one side effect is that people have a hard time figuring out that like other drugs, battling nicotine addiction is never a fight one wins forever. Difficult life events (the loss of a friend for me) can make you back to your comfort drug of choice, after 4 6 10 months or even years.

I'm not sensible to conspiracy theories and i have tried enough illegal drugs to know that the legal ones are not on a different plane - they are all different and legal drugs are amongst the most dangerous ones. And people have enough shortcomings that they pretend are caused by one dark conspiracy or another. Emotional, sensory, intellectual shortcomings. Or their failure to understand that addiction is a very serious matter when it comes to the "legal" drugs.

Bottom line, i'm not buying that without a peer reviewed article.
 
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Pav

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Here's the 60 minutes interview that the movie documented. Seems pretty acurate to me. I'm sure there's some fudging in any movie based on the truth, but the legal case and subsequent 60 minutes interview are well documented. Look up Jeffrey Wigand for more info.

Maybe the 60 minutes peice is what you were thinking of?

Jeffrey Wigand : Jeffrey Wigand on 60 Minutes

Wallace: [in CBS office]
Dr. Wigand says that Brown & Williamson manipulates and adjusts that nicotine fix, not by artificially adding nicotine, but by enhancing the effect of the nicotine through reuse of chemical additives like ammonia, whose process is known in the tobacco industry as "impact boosting."

Wigand: While not spiking nicotine. They clearly manipulate it.

Wallace: [visual of document]
The process is described in Brown & Williamson's leaf blender's manual and in other B&W documents.

Wigand: There's extensive use of this technology which is called ammonia chemistry that allows for nicotine to be more rapidly absorbed in the lung and therefore affect the brain and central nervous system.

Whether BT still does this is not known to me. Anyone keep up with the latest BS from BT?
 

stringchopper

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Aug 1, 2011
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I found this article, among others, by google searching for MAO Inhibitors in cigarettes


Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is a mitochondrial outer-membrane flavoenzyme involved in brain and peripheral oxidative catabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotic amines, including neurotoxic amines, and a well-known target for antidepressant and neuroprotective drugs. Recently, positron emission tomography imaging has shown that smokers have a much lower activity of peripheral and brain MAO-A (30%) and -B (40%) isozymes compared to non-smokers. This MAO inhibition results from a pharmacological effect of smoke, but little is known about its mechanism. Working with mainstream smoke collected from commercial cigarettes we confirmed that cigarette smoke is a potent inhibitor of human MAO-A and -B isozymes. MAO inhibition was partly reversible,
 

otrpu

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For the past six months, I haven't cared what is in tobacco cigarettes. Tapered off ever since I started "quitting". For more than six months now, haven't lit a tobacco cigarette. I'm knee deep around here in PV's, Carto's, Tanks, Batts, & ejuice. I'm done with Tobacco cigarettes, after 52 years. JMHO

Cheers,
otrpu
 

stringchopper

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Aug 1, 2011
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MAO inhibiters used to be used in old style anti-depressants although not prescribed by many now as they react with so many other substances.

So, if I understood the article correctly, smoking inhibits MAO activity, giving a feeling of euphoria (in the same way that the MAO Inhibitors do). With that, one should expect to have some emotional / psychological withdrawal even while continuing to get nicotine from a PV and e-juice.

For the past six months, I haven't cared what is in tobacco cigarettes. Tapered off ever since I started "quitting". For more than six months now, haven't lit a tobacco cigarette. I'm knee deep around here in PV's, Carto's, Tanks, Batts, & ejuice. I'm done with Tobacco cigarettes, after 52 years. JMHO

Cheers,
otrpu

wow! that's really something ortpu! 52 years! I'm really happy for you and feel like I'm in the same boat in some ways. Even though it was only 26 years for me, this is the first time that I feel that I don't need a cigarette. I went through some "withdrawal" after switching, but that was nowhere near the frustration I had when I quit cigarettes "cold turkey" last year.
 
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