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Kanger Subtank mini and eGo One

Discussion in 'New Members Forum' started by patricketurner, Jun 11, 2015.

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  1. patricketurner

    patricketurner New Member

    Jun 11, 2015
    I've got an eGo ONE battery that I plan on using with my Kanger Subtank Mini. The battery is said to only support down to .5 ohms and I was wondering how it would handle the rebuildable coil that comes with the subtank mini if I end up building it too low. Feedback would be greatly appreciated before I blow up my battery lol
     
  2. Cloudmann

    Cloudmann Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Mar 17, 2015
    North Charleston, SC
    The Ego One officialy fires down to 0.5 ohms. That said, I've rebuilt Kanger OCC coils down lower and have had them fire just fine. For safety, I wouldn't build lower than 0.4. I've seen the Ego One fire a 0.3 ohm coil, but ramp up time was longer than I'd liked to have seen. It fired normally on a 0.4 rebuild. Incidentally, the rba in the mini might have wicking issues with that low of a build. And the mini is going to look a little goofy on a battery that's 3mm skinnier.
     
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  3. patricketurner

    patricketurner New Member

    Jun 11, 2015
    Theres no way for me to measure builds at the moment, the eGo One is kind of the only setup I got. I wanted a tank that would work on that and something else down the road (maybe the eVic VT?) Is there a method of building or certain wires I should be using to stay in the .5-.8 ohm range?
     
  4. edyle

    edyle ECF Guru Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Like any other regulated mod it will simply not fire a coil below it's lower ohm limit.
    If it sees a load below 0.5 ohm, it assumes your coil is shorted out, and does not fire so as to prevent a problem.
     
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  5. Cloudmann

    Cloudmann Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Mar 17, 2015
    North Charleston, SC
    Right. Also, I'd recommend not firing a coil that you haven't tested for resistance. Go buy a $10 ohm meter. Lots of bad stuff can happen if you don't know for sure what resistance your coil has. Take a look at the steam engine, too. It'll break down coil building for you.
     
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