Lab Equipment: Must Have's and Gimicks

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RaisedFist

Full Member
Jul 20, 2019
44
102
    Hi there, I'm about to make a rather large order to start up my e-juice mixing lab and I was wondering, what do I REALLY need, now, I really want a Nitecore e-liquid Mixer NFF01, but I know I don't need it, not untill I get really good at making juice and am starting to make bigger quantities.
    I also ordered 25 10ml bottles, so I can make 5-7ml test batches to save on wastage, for that I ordered a proper scale and some 1ml syringes, to help with the small quantities I'll be working with.
    But what else would be your ESSENTIAL pieces of lab equipment for a first time buyer and starter e-juice maker?
    Wer're gonna have some fun with this thread, I can see it already, we're gonna get our vape geekness on!! :w00t:;):lol::banana:
     

    uthinkofsomething

    Ultra Member
    ECF Veteran
    Jun 7, 2015
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    Toledo, Ohio
      I like having larger squeeze bottles I can put vg and pg in, with small tips. I buy vg by the gallon and pg in 500ml bottles with crappy twist tops.
      I have some 20oz bottles (I think) made of ldpe, @Letitia pointed me at them on amazon, Oakmont brand or some such...
      And as far as bottles, if you want to reuse them get ldpe bottles, not PET.
      PET is not meant to be reused.
       

      RaisedFist

      Full Member
      Jul 20, 2019
      44
      102
        I like having larger squeeze bottles I can put vg and pg in, with small tips. I buy vg by the gallon and pg in 500ml bottles with crappy twist tops.
        I have some 20oz bottles (I think) made of ldpe, @Letitia pointed me at them on amazon, Oakmont brand or some such...
        And as far as bottles, if you want to reuse them get ldpe bottles, not PET.
        PET is not meant to be reused.
        Right, lucky I never ordered any PET bottles then :blush:
        I ordered 5 liters (I'm in South Africa, we work the Metric system baby!), of PG, 5 liters of VG, 200ml of nicotine and just a massive bunch of flavours, all 100ml for testing and playing purposes!
        I kinda thought ahead with the decanting of the PG anf VG, I bought 2x 500ml bottles with twist open caps, because you are never going to make any precision 10ml quantity e-juice pouring form a 5 liter bottle.
        Just a reference point, a gallon is just over 3 liters, so that's a whopper of a bottle! :headbang:
         

        IDJoel

        Vaping Master
        ECF Veteran
        Verified Member
        Feb 20, 2015
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        Boise, ID
          Essential? To me; that means:
          Ingredients:
          -- PG
          -- VG
          --Nicotine
          (first three can be in combination, or separate ingredients)
          -- One or more flavor concentrates

          A means to measure ingredients:
          -- Small assortment of syringes and blunt-tipped needles
          or
          -- A scale that has 0.01g resolution
          ----- if using a scale, without syringes, may need an additional means of dispensing concentrates that don't come in dropper-tipped bottles. Disposable/reusable pipettes, syringes, disposable/reusable eye droppers, or extra dropper-tipped bottles all solve the problem.

          Something to mix ingredients in:
          -- Can be re-purposed bottles from commercially bought e-liquids
          and/or
          -- New bottles

          A means to calculate the amount of ingredients to use:
          -- Paper and pencil
          or
          -- Pocket calculator
          or
          -- E-liquid calculator (can be on-line, or down-loadable)

          A work area that provides ample room to work, and is safely away from children, pets, and distractions... preferably with running water handy.

          Time

          Trying to mix, when one is in a rush, is a recipe for only failure. Time is also an e-liquid recipe's best/most consistent ally.

          A reasonable supply of ready-to-vape e-liquid on hand:
          The panic, and rush, to get something vapeable "right now;" can cause a mixer to cut corners, forget steps and/or ingredients, and be forced to vape unvapeable e-liquid. Having an adequate supply of juice, that is enjoyable to vape (commercial, and/or previous DIY), removes this added pressure to succeed immediately.

          A means to record your work:

          -- Paper and pencil
          -- Spreadsheet/word processing software
          -- (within) Certain e-liquid calculators
          The manner of recording notes doesn't matter. What matters, is that it is something the user will use, and then uses it. Notes are essential for recording recipe ideas, what does/doesn't work, and what might want to be done differently next time.

          Nothing is more heartbreaking than to mix up the genuine "perfect mix," only to not remember what was done, and never be able to repeat it. Notes are also a good tool to avoid repeating past mistakes. :)

          That's my list of essentials. For me, everything else becomes a matter of convenience. As an old(er) guy, with crappy eyes and shaky hands; I do find the following nearly essential.
          -- A digital scale became essential for me; because I couldn't see the tiny graduation marks on the smaller syringes.
          -- A secondary large-mouthed primary mixing vessel (beakers, in my case); because my shaky hands kept missing the tiny-mouthed e-liquid bottles.
          -- A small funnel to transfer my mixes from the beakers to the bottles; again, shaky hands.
          -- A small hobby paint mixer; because I am lazy, and hated shaking all the bottles.


          I have tried a bunch of additional tools, tricks, and and gimmicks; but none have lasted the long haul, for me. Others, I'm sure, have had different experiences; and those are every bit as valid, as my own.

          That is the beauty of DIY; taking a basic process, and making it your own. Successful mixers, that I have known, all have a few things in common:
          -- they find a way to keep it fun, so they want to keep doing it.
          -- they are willing to fail. Mixing a bad batch (or 3, or 10) is not the end of the world. They keep trying different things.
          -- they are willing to learn from their mistakes. They don't say this tastes nasty and give up. Instead, they try to figure out why it tastes nasty. Instead of looking at a bad batch as a failure; they are more likely to look at it as a puzzle to be figured out. For some, it can even be a motivator.

          Those who most commonly fail as DIYers are:
          -- The ones that have no time (family, commitments, good old "life"). (This is no fault of the individual; it just isn't the right time to embark on DIY.)
          -- Those who don't have the have the patience to learn from their mistakes; and change their thinking and processes. The "Veruca Salt's" of the world generally don't do well with DIY. (Everybody sing "I want it now!")
          -- Those who "know it all". Those who think they have it all figured out... before they ever start mixing. These folks tend to think in terms of "this is how it should be," instead of thinking "this is how it is... what do I do next?" They will blame everything but themselves and their understanding and expectations; and usually give up out of frustration.
          -- Those expecting to be professionally successful/profitable mixers right out of the gate. Unless they are living in a part of the world, that bans access to commercial completion, that is unlikely to happen. They don't understand the time, effort, and experience required, to turn out consistently good juice.
           

          RaisedFist

          Full Member
          Jul 20, 2019
          44
          102
            Essential? To me; that means:
            Ingredients:
            -- PG
            -- VG
            --Nicotine
            (first three can be in combination, or separate ingredients)
            -- One or more flavor concentrates

            A means to measure ingredients:
            -- Small assortment of syringes and blunt-tipped needles
            or
            -- A scale that has 0.01g resolution
            ----- if using a scale, without syringes, may need an additional means of dispensing concentrates that don't come in dropper-tipped bottles. Disposable/reusable pipettes, syringes, disposable/reusable eye droppers, or extra dropper-tipped bottles all solve the problem.

            Something to mix ingredients in:
            -- Can be re-purposed bottles from commercially bought e-liquids
            and/or
            -- New bottles

            A means to calculate the amount of ingredients to use:
            -- Paper and pencil
            or
            -- Pocket calculator
            or
            -- E-liquid calculator (can be on-line, or down-loadable)

            A work area that provides ample room to work, and is safely away from children, pets, and distractions... preferably with running water handy.

            Time

            Trying to mix, when one is in a rush, is a recipe for only failure. Time is also an e-liquid recipe's best/most consistent ally.

            A reasonable supply of ready-to-vape e-liquid on hand:
            The panic, and rush, to get something vapeable "right now;" can cause a mixer to cut corners, forget steps and/or ingredients, and be forced to vape unvapeable e-liquid. Having an adequate supply of juice, that is enjoyable to vape (commercial, and/or previous DIY), removes this added pressure to succeed immediately.

            A means to record your work:

            -- Paper and pencil
            -- Spreadsheet/word processing software
            -- (within) Certain e-liquid calculators
            The manner of recording notes doesn't matter. What matters, is that it is something the user will use, and then uses it. Notes are essential for recording recipe ideas, what does/doesn't work, and what might want to be done differently next time.

            Nothing is more heartbreaking than to mix up the genuine "perfect mix," only to not remember what was done, and never be able to repeat it. Notes are also a good tool to avoid repeating past mistakes. :)

            That's my list of essentials. For me, everything else becomes a matter of convenience. As an old(er) guy, with crappy eyes and shaky hands; I do find the following nearly essential.
            -- A digital scale became essential for me; because I couldn't see the tiny graduation marks on the smaller syringes.
            -- A secondary large-mouthed primary mixing vessel (beakers, in my case); because my shaky hands kept missing the tiny-mouthed e-liquid bottles.
            -- A small funnel to transfer my mixes from the beakers to the bottles; again, shaky hands.
            -- A small hobby paint mixer; because I am lazy, and hated shaking all the bottles.


            I have tried a bunch of additional tools, tricks, and and gimmicks; but none have lasted the long haul, for me. Others, I'm sure, have had different experiences; and those are every bit as valid, as my own.

            That is the beauty of DIY; taking a basic process, and making it your own. Successful mixers, that I have known, all have a few things in common:
            -- they find a way to keep it fun, so they want to keep doing it.
            -- they are willing to fail. Mixing a bad batch (or 3, or 10) is not the end of the world. They keep trying different things.
            -- they are willing to learn from their mistakes. They don't say this tastes nasty and give up. Instead, they try to figure out why it tastes nasty. Instead of looking at a bad batch as a failure; they are more likely to look at it as a puzzle to be figured out. For some, it can even be a motivator.

            Those who most commonly fail as DIYers are:
            -- The ones that have no time (family, commitments, good old "life"). (This is no fault of the individual; it just isn't the right time to embark on DIY.)
            -- Those who don't have the have the patience to learn from their mistakes; and change their thinking and processes. The "Veruca Salt's" of the world generally don't do well with DIY. (Everybody sing "I want it now!")
            -- Those who "know it all". Those who think they have it all figured out... before they ever start mixing. These folks tend to think in terms of "this is how it should be," instead of thinking "this is how it is... what do I do next?" They will blame everything but themselves and their understanding and expectations; and usually give up out of frustration.
            -- Those expecting to be professionally successful/profitable mixers right out of the gate. Unless they are living in a part of the world, that bans access to commercial completion, that is unlikely to happen. They don't understand the time, effort, and experience required, to turn out consistently good juice.
            Wow, that's a lot to digest!
            As far as keeping notes, I'm a chaotic personality, but I can be quite meticulous and obcessive.
            I've already got the notebooks and sections for recipes and perfect percentages set out on OneNote :headbang:
            I think once I get going, my note taking style will change, but we shall see, it's going to be an epic adventure!!:banana:
             

            DeloresRose

            Vaping Master
            ECF Veteran
            Apr 25, 2014
            8,571
            62,750
            toledo ohio
              Much of this will be redundant, but I think it helps a new mixer to see how many people use the same methods.

              Eliquid calculator.

              Notebook- I use actual paper and pen because it’s easier to freestyle notes, and organically shows a timeline to my mixing.

              I write down the recipe name as saved in the juice calculator, recipe, date mixed and tested and anything else. I started tracking what atty/build I test them in as well.

              I use plastic graduated beakers, a 250, 100, and 10 ml. 3 and 1 ml pipettes.

              I’m still mixing by volume because I spent over 5 years developing my recipes and am loathe to start almost from scratch to replicate them by weight.

              I have bunches of 15 ml glass dropper bottles for tests. Easier to screw off the top to sniff or add stuff than the plastic ones, and less likely to be knocked over. Easy to wash, too and they don’t retain and smell or flavor, even with mint or cinnamon.

              I use whatever ldpe bottles I find a good price on, 30 mls.

              I hand write my labels, but you could print them on your computer if you prefer.

              Disposable gloves. Some have no issue getting nic on their hands, but I get a little nic buzzy. Plus I hate having anything on my hands. I’d spend too much time washing all the ingredients off and it wouldn’t be any fun.

              I mix in the kitchen for ease. But it’s MY kitchen. Whoever in the household does most of the cooking/cleaning is in charge of the kitchen and to be safe, anyone else ought to ask if it’s okay to mix there.

              Which leads me to another point I’d like to make, do not commandeer other people’s stuff for your mixing or any other vape related hobbies. If you need a pair of scissors or a little brush or screwdriver, ASK. Do not swipe them from the Mrs’s Sewing room. Somebody recently admitted to stealing a small brush from his mom’s sewing kit. You know, some of those machines cost thousands of dollars, and they all require constant maintenance. If a bit goes missing it means the machine is unusable until we order the exact replacement from the manufacturer, and those are never cheap, but we will not use some cheap thing from fasttech- a thing that will suit a vaper’s needs just fine- that is not likely to work right for the machine. Sewing scissors can cost $60 and up, use them on paper or plastic and you ruin them for fabric.

              Sorry about the rant, but please be respectful.
               

              uthinkofsomething

              Ultra Member
              ECF Veteran
              Jun 7, 2015
              2,157
              8,387
              43
              Toledo, Ohio
                Gloves, definitely. When handling nicotine. I use 100mg/ml which is not incredibly dangerous but I don't like a hard nic buzz at all....

                My most valuable (to me) tools are ELR's calculator, a scale, some plastic pipettes which I use for nic and the few flavorings I get in non-dropper top bottles, and maybe those squeeze bottles. I have a supply of large mouth bottles from dropperbottles.com that make things easier, but I also use the ones with the teeny tiny neck too lol. I mix right into the bottle on the scale. Here's a tip: I think a lot of people mix in a certain order. I do nic first, then flavorings, pg, and finally vg.
                And this forum. 100%. I learned it all here really. I make all my own liquid and for my wife, since last September. She vapes a little, I vape a lot.
                 

                uthinkofsomething

                Ultra Member
                ECF Veteran
                Jun 7, 2015
                2,157
                8,387
                43
                Toledo, Ohio
                  Essential? To me; that means:
                  Ingredients:
                  -- PG
                  -- VG
                  --Nicotine
                  (first three can be in combination, or separate ingredients)
                  -- One or more flavor concentrates

                  A means to measure ingredients:
                  -- Small assortment of syringes and blunt-tipped needles
                  or
                  -- A scale that has 0.01g resolution
                  ----- if using a scale, without syringes, may need an additional means of dispensing concentrates that don't come in dropper-tipped bottles. Disposable/reusable pipettes, syringes, disposable/reusable eye droppers, or extra dropper-tipped bottles all solve the problem.

                  Something to mix ingredients in:
                  -- Can be re-purposed bottles from commercially bought e-liquids
                  and/or
                  -- New bottles

                  A means to calculate the amount of ingredients to use:
                  -- Paper and pencil
                  or
                  -- Pocket calculator
                  or
                  -- E-liquid calculator (can be on-line, or down-loadable)

                  A work area that provides ample room to work, and is safely away from children, pets, and distractions... preferably with running water handy.

                  Time

                  Trying to mix, when one is in a rush, is a recipe for only failure. Time is also an e-liquid recipe's best/most consistent ally.

                  A reasonable supply of ready-to-vape e-liquid on hand:
                  The panic, and rush, to get something vapeable "right now;" can cause a mixer to cut corners, forget steps and/or ingredients, and be forced to vape unvapeable e-liquid. Having an adequate supply of juice, that is enjoyable to vape (commercial, and/or previous DIY), removes this added pressure to succeed immediately.

                  A means to record your work:

                  -- Paper and pencil
                  -- Spreadsheet/word processing software
                  -- (within) Certain e-liquid calculators
                  The manner of recording notes doesn't matter. What matters, is that it is something the user will use, and then uses it. Notes are essential for recording recipe ideas, what does/doesn't work, and what might want to be done differently next time.

                  Nothing is more heartbreaking than to mix up the genuine "perfect mix," only to not remember what was done, and never be able to repeat it. Notes are also a good tool to avoid repeating past mistakes. :)

                  That's my list of essentials. For me, everything else becomes a matter of convenience. As an old(er) guy, with crappy eyes and shaky hands; I do find the following nearly essential.
                  -- A digital scale became essential for me; because I couldn't see the tiny graduation marks on the smaller syringes.
                  -- A secondary large-mouthed primary mixing vessel (beakers, in my case); because my shaky hands kept missing the tiny-mouthed e-liquid bottles.
                  -- A small funnel to transfer my mixes from the beakers to the bottles; again, shaky hands.
                  -- A small hobby paint mixer; because I am lazy, and hated shaking all the bottles.


                  I have tried a bunch of additional tools, tricks, and and gimmicks; but none have lasted the long haul, for me. Others, I'm sure, have had different experiences; and those are every bit as valid, as my own.

                  That is the beauty of DIY; taking a basic process, and making it your own. Successful mixers, that I have known, all have a few things in common:
                  -- they find a way to keep it fun, so they want to keep doing it.
                  -- they are willing to fail. Mixing a bad batch (or 3, or 10) is not the end of the world. They keep trying different things.
                  -- they are willing to learn from their mistakes. They don't say this tastes nasty and give up. Instead, they try to figure out why it tastes nasty. Instead of looking at a bad batch as a failure; they are more likely to look at it as a puzzle to be figured out. For some, it can even be a motivator.

                  Those who most commonly fail as DIYers are:
                  -- The ones that have no time (family, commitments, good old "life"). (This is no fault of the individual; it just isn't the right time to embark on DIY.)
                  -- Those who don't have the have the patience to learn from their mistakes; and change their thinking and processes. The "Veruca Salt's" of the world generally don't do well with DIY. (Everybody sing "I want it now!")
                  -- Those who "know it all". Those who think they have it all figured out... before they ever start mixing. These folks tend to think in terms of "this is how it should be," instead of thinking "this is how it is... what do I do next?" They will blame everything but themselves and their understanding and expectations; and usually give up out of frustration.
                  -- Those expecting to be professionally successful/profitable mixers right out of the gate. Unless they are living in a part of the world, that bans access to commercial completion, that is unlikely to happen. They don't understand the time, effort, and experience required, to turn out consistently good juice.
                  I need to bookmark this post or it needs to be pinned or something.
                  :thumbs:
                   

                  mikepetro

                  Vape Geek
                  ECF Veteran
                  Verified Member
                  Feb 22, 2013
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                  Newport News, Virginia, United States
                    Luer-Lok Syringes can be found cheap, about 10 cents each, at Veterinarian supply stores. Pretty much makes them disposable. I bought a box of each of several sizes.
                    upload_2019-7-26_8-52-22.png


                    These Luer-Lok tips are very cheap on FT and are great. They fit Luer-Lok Syringes and bottles. You can get them in various sizes, get the small ones for thin liquids and cut the tip back for heavy viscosity liquids like VG.
                    upload_2019-7-26_8-42-54.png


                    These 118ml bottles (other sizes available) accept standard Luer-Lok tips and needles and are perfect for dispensing VG and PG. Or a Master Batch of unflavored nic. I vape 36mgl, so I make a Master Batch of unflavored 50/50 PG/VG 40mgl and then I know I can add ~10% flavoring and hit my desired strength. Add 1ml of flavor to a 10ml bottle and fill it up with my Master Batch, easy peazy.....
                    (Click pic for link)
                    upload_2019-7-26_8-45-40.png

                    These Luer Lok caps make it easy to cap off your bottles when not in use.
                    (Click pic for link)
                    upload_2019-7-26_9-8-40.png
                     
                    Last edited:

                    GOMuniEsq

                    Self-Proclaimed Member
                    ECF Veteran
                    Aug 25, 2012
                    1,159
                    3,546
                    Alberta, Canada
                      Necessary equipment is very limited. You will save yourself more headaches by preparation and planning than spending money on fancy equipment.

                      First, you need record keeping. Juice Calculator is the perfect solution. After installing it, input all of your ingredients. Include the cost, volume, composition (PG or VG base), number of grams per mL (see Note 1), and number of drops per mL determined by experimentation (see Note 2). Time spent now will pay off later. Create a recipe. Adjust the settings so it show grams and drops. This software will keep track of your inventory and also display the cost of each batch.

                      To do a good job you need to have an accurate way of measuring, so a good 0.01g scale with wall adapter is crucial. The AWS LB-501 digital scale is a favorite. Volumetric measuring is wasteful, messy, and inaccurate except in large batches when you already know what you're doing.

                      Store some bulk VG and PG in plastic 100mL dropper bottles for convenience. Figure out how many drops per mL these containers dispense.

                      Dropwise mixing is very useful for making small 5mL test batches that your scale will have difficulty accurately measuring. This is where taking the time to calculate drops/mL for each of your ingredients comes in handy. Have a few 10mL bottles to store and mix these test batches.

                      Then you need a way to easily sample your test batches. An RDA with a bare coil is ideal.

                      Once preparation is complete, simply follow the recipe, adding ingredients sequentially in grams or drops depending on the batch size. (Be sure that flavorings and nicotine are shaken prior to addition)

                      Mixing is the most trivial part of the entire process. There is no need for electric mixing equipment. A 250mL borosilicate glass beaker and glass stir rod easily suffice. Stir until the solution is of uniform composition with no VG streaks. This is accomplished in about one minute. Test batches may be mixed by shaking for a minute in a 10mL bottle.

                      Then comes bottling. "Unicorn" bottles work best as they can easily be refilled. Avoid "chubby gorilla" bottles as these are intended for one time use. Regular 10mL, 30mL and 60mL LDPE dropper bottles with a pointy tip are best. Smaller bottles and bottles with safety caps are less likely to leak in your pocket or bag.

                      Note 1: The software will calculate g/mL based on composition at the click of a button. Flavors in PG base weigh 1.038 g/mL. In VG base 1.260 g/mL.

                      Note 2: Most flavorings come in dropper bottles and drop sizes vary based on the nozzle, viscosity, and ambient temperature and pressure. To figure out how many drops of flavor equal one mL, use your scale and count the number of drops that are required to achieve the weight of 1 mL of each flavoring. This must be manually input for each ingredient.

                      Bill of materials:
                      1x AWS LB-501 digital scale
                      1x RDA with a bare coil for sampling
                      1x 250mL borosilicate glass beaker
                      1x glass stir rod
                      2x 100mL LDPE dropper bottles for immediate VG and PG storage
                      1x 30mL tinted glass bottle with dropper for immediate nicotine storage (bulk nicotine should be stored in the freezer)
                      Some 3mL disposable plastic pipettes for transferring flavorings that do not come in dropper bottles
                      6x each of 10mL, 30mL, and 60mL LDPE dropper "unicorn" bottles for various mixes
                       
                      Last edited:
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                      JCinFLA

                      Vaping Master
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                      Oct 21, 2015
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                        Volumetric measuring is wasteful, messy, an inaccurate except in large batches when you already know what you're doing.

                        That statement is your personal opinion...not a fact. I've found that it helps DIY newbies distinguish between the 2... if "IMO", or "from my own experience", or "to me" are used somewhere in statements like that. There are many of us who measure by volume and don't find it to be wasteful, messy, nor inaccurate except in large batches when we already know what we're doing. ;)
                         

                        GOMuniEsq

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                        Aug 25, 2012
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                        Alberta, Canada
                          That statement is your personal opinion...not a fact. I've found that it helps DIY newbies distinguish between the 2... if "IMO", or "from my own experience", or "to me" are used somewhere in statements like that. There are many of us who measure by volume and don't find it to be wasteful, messy, nor inaccurate except in large batches when we already know what we're doing. ;)
                          Everything I post is implicitly a personal opinion. Volumetric measuring leaves ingredient residue on all of the glassware which necessitates cleanup and means less of the good stuff in your bottle. VG in particular coats the surface of graduated cylinders and must be scraped off, which I consider messy.
                           

                          Skeebo

                          Vaping Master
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                          May 31, 2014
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                            Which leads me to another point I’d like to make, do not commandeer other people’s stuff for your mixing or any other vape related hobbies. If you need a pair of scissors or a little brush or screwdriver, ASK. Do not swipe them from the Mrs’s Sewing room. Somebody recently admitted to stealing a small brush from his mom’s sewing kit. You know, some of those machines cost thousands of dollars, and they all require constant maintenance. If a bit goes missing it means the machine is unusable until we order the exact replacement from the manufacturer, and those are never cheap, but we will not use some cheap thing from fasttech- a thing that will suit a vaper’s needs just fine- that is not likely to work right for the machine. Sewing scissors can cost $60 and up, use them on paper or plastic and you ruin them for fabric.

                            Sorry about the rant, but please be respectful.

                            This doesn't include the wife's toothbrush, right?
                             

                            Skeebo

                            Vaping Master
                            ECF Veteran
                            May 31, 2014
                            7,001
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                              The only thing I can add to everyone else's great advice is something I personally find useful. Use a 10-15ml bottle to dispense your nicotine. Another good idea is having a 10ml syringe dedicated solely to your nicotine to refill your 10ml dispensing bottle from your bulk stock. Depending on how much bulk nicotine you purchase you're more than likely going to keep that in the fridge.

                              I like to dispense my vg from a 500 ml squeeze bottle with a nozzle on it so I can squeeze it in the mix bottle. Then when I get closer to the measurement I want I use a 30ml bottle with vg so I can be more precise.

                              I like using a 10ml syringe to dispense my pg.

                              Good luck!
                               

                              Letitia

                              Citrus Junkie
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                              Apr 2, 2017
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                                Pre-mixing your bases saves so much time and cleanup. I mix mine and Meg's salts base up in 600ml batches in these bottles. That leaves plenty of head room for a good shake. They do have some cheaper but these do not leak, been using the same 3 for close to year and zero problems. I give them a hot water rinse every 3 batches.

                                https://www.amazon.com/Plastic-Sque...d=1564167491&s=gateway&sprefix=Oaklyn+&sr=8-6
                                 

                                mikepetro

                                Vape Geek
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                                Feb 22, 2013
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                                Newport News, Virginia, United States
                                  That statement is your personal opinion...not a fact. I've found that it helps DIY newbies distinguish between the 2... if "IMO", or "from my own experience", or "to me" are used somewhere in statements like that. There are many of us who measure by volume and don't find it to be wasteful, messy, nor inaccurate except in large batches when we already know what we're doing. ;)

                                  Everything I post is implicitly a personal opinion. Volumetric measuring leaves ingredient residue on all of the glassware which necessitates cleanup and means less of the good stuff in your bottle. VG in particular coats the surface of graduated cylinders and must be scraped off, which I consider messy.

                                  IMHO, you can measure accurately using either method. Its all in what comes more natural to you.

                                  I have scales accurate to .001g, but I find them a pain to mix with as I tend to over dispense when adding by the drop or squirt. Not to mention having to figure out (and keep track of) the drops/ml for every one of my couple dozen flavor bottles. I have trusted friends that swear by gravimetric though. Using syringes and bottles to dispense into a beaker or bottle just comes more natural to me.

                                  A few tricks to volumetric mixing.
                                  • Know what a meniscus is
                                  • Try to use the smallest syringe that can dispense the total volume of your ingredient in one measurement. For example, if you need to dispense 18ml then use a 20ml syringe vs a 10ml. Having to make 2 measurements doubles the possibility of error.
                                   
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