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Most durable wood for Woodvil?

Discussion in 'Reos Mods' started by cadman, May 19, 2015.

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  1. cadman

    cadman Super Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Apr 1, 2009
    Oklahoma
    Which wood is the toughest, most durable? The higher the wood density, the stronger the wood.

    Find the Woodvil that you want and do a search on the density of the wood, like the Zebra/Ebony combo:
    Zebra 50 lbs/cu.ft.
    Ebony 57 lbs/cu.ft.

    This should be a durable combination.

    Just something to think about when choosing the Woodvil that you want.
     
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  2. MamaTried

    MamaTried Vaping Master Verified Member ECF Veteran

    May 31, 2013
    Northern California
    Karen has posted a link to a listing that mentions all of the different wood characteristics

    but, of course, i forgot to bookmark it


    based on personal experience, however, curly oak stands up to abuse as well or better than the metal grands
     
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  3. RuDawg7890

    RuDawg7890 Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Not that I've had time for it lately, but I am a hobbyist woodworker. I do not have a Woodvil, but I've seen what types of woods Rob uses. IIRC, he uses all hardwoods. Off of the top of my head, maple is probably the softest wood he uses, but maple is still a hardwood. Most of his woods are exotics, which are extremely hard woods. Regardless of how hard the wood is, some care should still be taken. Even the hardest of woods can still be brittle, they can be strong in how much weight they can withstand, but dropping on a hard floor can still chip them.
     
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  4. nerak

    nerak ECF Guru Verified Member ECF Veteran

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  5. MamaTried

    MamaTried Vaping Master Verified Member ECF Veteran

    May 31, 2013
    Northern California
    • Like Like x 1
  6. nerak

    nerak ECF Guru Verified Member ECF Veteran

  7. cadman

    cadman Super Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Apr 1, 2009
    Oklahoma
  8. Spydro

    Spydro Sindoyen Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Apr 20, 2013
    Sin City
    To add to what RD said, IMO... I also crafted endless worldwide species of woods, quite seriously for over 50 years, where the exact traits, toxicities, and resonance of each species were factors I had to learn and know. And most of my woods were imported direct from sawyer friends in the countries where the species grew. In the long run expensive, but how you get the best of the best.

    Charts and graphs are fine as far as they go, but they are generalizations. There are many factors involved with any particular piece of wood that may or may not fit that particular piece into a generalization for that species. IE, where within the plant X piece of wood grew (root, buttress, trunk, branch, crotch, graft, heartwood, sapwood, root burl, aerial burl, etc); what environment the plant grew in (rate of growth); whether harvested from live wood or dead fall; how it was cut (flatsawn, quartersawn, riftsawn, etc); how was it cured (kiln or air dried), etc. IOW, some wood from an individual plant/given species can be very durable, some not as durable, some weak; some prone to checking/cracking, some not; some more prone to warping, some not, etc.

    Weight in itself does not make a wood more durable. The heaviest will not float (they sink like a rock), but some heavy species can still be brittle. Not the heaviest, but the king of durability is the Guaiacum species. Even bearings have been made out of it. More flexible woods may stand up better to drops. Which direction the grain runs in a project another factor. Robert covers that pretty well with his Woodvil's running the grain long. And by rounding the corners he adds a lot of durability to any species or wood he uses. The doors themselves are at the highest risk to warping/splitting by default. Unless chunks are actually gouged out/broken off and lost most woods are repairable, from to near as good as new to good enough fairly easily.

    IMO the Woodvil is a well thought out solid design no matter what wood Rob uses, sold for a reasonable price that all can afford. I would like to see some offered with higher grade woods used in them, but that would add to their cost, and with some exhibition grade woods could make the price way out of the range of the budget conscious.
     
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  9. Fuzzy Bruce

    Fuzzy Bruce Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    May 21, 2014
    Fort Liquordale, Fl.
    I can hardly wait to see the new Woodvils in the hands of reonaughts! I just know the abuse my Grands take so, I will leave them to you folks.
     
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