Oxidized nicotine - what is science behind that?

Status
Not open for further replies.

rokyo87

Senior Member
ECF Veteran
Jan 22, 2016
203
331
35
OK, I have some questions about oxidized nicotine.

1. How this process occurs from the chemistry point of view?
2. Can nicotine became more harmful with oxidation, even carcenogenic maybe?
3. How can I storage my nicotine for long time?

You can provide me with links if you want...

Thank you for your answers in advance.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: defdock

anavidfan

ECF Guru
ECF Veteran
Verified Member
Jun 14, 2012
10,216
19,613
U.S.
Im sure someone will post with some more "scientific" explanation but here is my "average" dummy explanation.

Oxidation is when something chemically changes due to exposure to oxygen.
Like when a banana starts to go brown, or a potato etc. This does not mean its gone bad, or toxic, its just changed.

Most people store their nic in dark amber, cobalt, or green glass so light exposure is low. FOr long time storage the freezer is best.

As far as when it goes from just getting darker to a complete chemical change making it harmful , that I will leave to the experts that will surely chime in.

These days oxidation has gotten the reputation of being "not good" because of all the antioxidants being advertised. They are saying that if you eat certain foods it will keep our cells from oxidizing= aging, bad...
Not necessarily so. Can actually be bad to people with certain medical conditions or eating too many.
 

zoiDman

My -0^10 = Nothing at All*
Supporting Member
ECF Veteran
Apr 16, 2010
40,971
1
81,982
So-Cal
Thank you for answers.

I am especially interested if the process of oxidization can change nicotine into some more harmful substance... I am not a chemist so this is maybe a stupid question... :)

I don't have a strong background in Chemistry.

But Oxidation is basically the Giving up of an Electron(s) by one Element/Compound to another Element/Compound. The process of Giving Up an Electron(s) (Oxidation) and Gaining of an Electron(s) (Reduction) is called a Redox.

Everything in the Chemical World is seeking a Stable State. And some Elements/Compounds would like to Give Up an Electron to do so. While other Elements/Compounds are able to except an Electron. So when these two Elements/Compounds meet, a Redox can occur.

As far as I know, the Oxidation of Nicotine does Not make Nicotine any More or any Less harmful in e-Cigarettes. But it may/can effect the Taste of what an e-liquid tastes like.

The 3 Biggest Factors of where or not Nicotine will Oxidize is the presence of...

Oxygen
Heat
UV Light

So a Nicotine Base (or e-liquid) should Oxidize Less if it is stored in a Sealed Glass Bottle in a Cool, Dark Place verse a Nicotine Base that stored in an Open Plastic Bottle in a Warm Sunny window box.

Keeping Nicotine Base in a Warm Sunny window box is an Extreme. I know. But you get the Idea.
 

MacTechVpr

Vaping Master
Supporting Member
ECF Veteran
Verified Member
Aug 24, 2013
5,715
14,248
Hollywood (Beach), FL
…Oxidation is basically the Giving up of an Electron(s) by one Element/Compound to another Element/Compound. The process of Giving Up an Electron(s) (Oxidation) and Gaining of an Electron(s) (Reduction) is called a Redox.

Everything in the Chemical World is seeking a Stable State. And some Elements/Compounds would like to Give Up an Electron to do so. While other Elements/Compounds are able to except an Electron. So when these two Elements/Compounds meet, a Redox can occur…

So a more basic and related question, why would throat hit then increase with oxidation?

Good luck. :)
 

zoiDman

My -0^10 = Nothing at All*
Supporting Member
ECF Veteran
Apr 16, 2010
40,971
1
81,982
So-Cal
So a more basic and related question, why would throat hit then increase with oxidation?

Good luck. :)

No Clue.

Because I'm not even sure what Throat Hit even is? Or if it is the Same for All People?

Is TH when there is a More Efficient absorption of Nicotine? Maybe because of a different pH?

I gave some Nicotine Base to a Friend of mine once because I didn't like it. It had a way to Peppery Taste for the Fruit/Dessert Flavors I was into.

My Friend told me that it had a Lot of TH. I didn't think it had any More or any Less TH than my other Nicotine Base. It just Didn't Taste as Clean.
 

anavidfan

ECF Guru
ECF Veteran
Verified Member
Jun 14, 2012
10,216
19,613
U.S.
Hmmm , very interesting.

Reminds me of me with my collection of really, really old vintage perfume bottles.

Many I get still have some liquid inside. I notice they are real dark, almost a chocolate/ amber color, some with sediments.

Because Im curious, I have many times taken a sniff, and it smells strong... real strong, and hits you as alcohol. Ive put some on, and in a few minutes the perfume stabilizes, and since I remember many of them, are just like they were decades ago.

I think, depending on what the chemical make up is , oxidation does not really change it.

When it comes to foods, though, oxidized bananas and apples, are still good, but is a precursor to "spoiling" ?
 

zoiDman

My -0^10 = Nothing at All*
Supporting Member
ECF Veteran
Apr 16, 2010
40,971
1
81,982
So-Cal
My only interest is if oxidized nicotine is more harmful than non-oxidized nicotine... And I can't find definitive answer... :)

I think if Oxidized Nicotine was somehow more Harmful than Non-Oxidized Nicotine, that it would be Plastered All Over the Internet.

And the ECF would have Dozens of Threads regarding it.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Users who are viewing this thread