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The 5v Chuck

Discussion in 'Thag Built / The Chuck' started by steven.rn, Nov 16, 2009.

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  1. steven.rn

    steven.rn Super Member ECF Veteran

    May 1, 2009
    Ohio
    ... oh, there's gotta be a way... one of those TI voltage regulators wired into the brass screw on cap or something. Mayhap a resistor of xxx ohms... Modders do that stuff to nicosticks and such to step down voltage.

    I thought of making a disk with a resistor in the middle, contacting the batt on one side with the spring contacting the other with the ends of the resistor soldered one to the top and one to the bottom with supports around it- wouldn't have to be very wide and there's enough play to permit it. For all I know you could use a voltage regulator in the same way.

    Just tossing this out to see if any of the creative peeps out there that know a heckuva lot more than I do (to boot, a blind man could solder better than me:cry:).

    To think of it, a kid that's taken even an elementary electrical class would know more than me, so if you're reading this, you probably do... any thoughts?
     
  2. AngusATAT

    AngusATAT Captain Tightpants Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Apr 2, 2009
    GA, USA
    It would be easy, actually. You could use a voltage booster with the 18650 battery, or a voltage regulator with two RCR123A batteries. Take a look in the modder's section, and you can find a wiring diagram that would work. I've got some voltage regulators from TI sitting at home right now.

    However... personally, I don't think it's necessary. They already vape like a 5v mod, or at least darn close to it.
     
  3. doots

    doots Vaping Master Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Aug 22, 2009
    Nerf has come up with a 5v atty that he has had made.

    You can ask Nerf the prices on them. There is built in resistance in them that creates a 5v output.
     
  4. AngusATAT

    AngusATAT Captain Tightpants Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Apr 2, 2009
    GA, USA
    That's good info, doots... thanks!
     
  5. cpcp68

    cpcp68 Senior Member ECF Veteran

    May 29, 2009
    Knoxville, TN
    If I were to design a 5V chuck, I would use the MAX608 DC-DC converter to step up a single, high Amps/hr cell to 5V. it has a nice relatively small footprint, can drive the current needed and does not require too many external parts. It does require a few, so do not think the board would be super-tiny.
    sure, a single resistor from two Li-ion cells would do it too, but the DC-DC would give out a very consistent 5V until the battery dies.
    a regulator would work too off two cells, but it would waste energy just like a resistor and would not be as consistent as the DC DC.
    if someone is interested in trying I will design a schematic, sadly, I do not have time to do it myself.
     
  6. cpcp68

    cpcp68 Senior Member ECF Veteran

    May 29, 2009
    Knoxville, TN
    I totally agree with you.
     
  7. steven.rn

    steven.rn Super Member ECF Veteran

    May 1, 2009
    Ohio
    Thanks for the input, guys- I can see how the resistor would be inferior- and, mayhap not worth the step-down or step up.

    Of course, no mountain actually needs to be climbed..... ;-)
     
  8. kwcharlie

    kwcharlie Ultra Member ECF Veteran

    Apr 24, 2009
    Houston
    I've been running a test jig off a variable power supply and the current at 5 volts through a 510 is almost the same as the current to the same 510 on my chuck with a fresh battery, had to put a WAG in for the resistance of the test adapter screwed on the chuck to bring out the wires.
    But don't post something like that anywhere, I'm the 'fan boy' for suggesting that CaSHMeRe use the same test rig to find a tube for the Prodigy that had enough resistance to eliminate his resistor. Said my chuck vaped just like his Prodigy and that was the end of any engineering discussion on that thread.
    [​IMG]
    to sum it up this doesn't need to be done, 5 volts isn't necessary because of the lower resistance of the chuck AND it can't be seen with an ohm meter, you have to 'move the electrons' to see the difference.
    PS i call it FrankenChuck
     
  9. cpcp68

    cpcp68 Senior Member ECF Veteran

    May 29, 2009
    Knoxville, TN
    well, I was curious and I tested the resistance of the chuck assembly.
    I used a fluke 177 DVM. it reads 0.1 ohm when the leads are shorted. It reads 0.1 ohm from the connector ground to the threaded part of the tube; it reads 0.1 ohm from the cap thread to the spring. not to be repetitive, it reads 0.1 ohm from the inner contact to the outer contact. I just do not see any appreciable changes on the meter.

    (I did verify that the DVM works! :))
     
  10. kwcharlie

    kwcharlie Ultra Member ECF Veteran

    Apr 24, 2009
    Houston
    That's what is expected, Flukes just aren't made for this kind of measurements, motor shops use a micro ohm meter that pumps a few amps through the windings, the current would show a difference but I'm not into testing anymore, the chuck is just right on 510 and the Prodigy hits a 801 right on the spot.
    Got a copper ordered, let know how it works
     
  11. cpcp68

    cpcp68 Senior Member ECF Veteran

    May 29, 2009
    Knoxville, TN
    right. you need a 4-wire measurement, but anything that cannot be read by a regular DVM is plenty good for vaping.
     
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