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Question about differences in coils

Discussion in 'New Members Forum' started by stara03, Oct 14, 2018.

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  1. stara03

    stara03 Full Member

    Jul 21, 2018
    Hi! Just a quick question. I have been using an Aspire zelos for the last couple months (and love it. I thought I loved my Aspire breeze 2-until I tried the zelos). Anyway the zelos came with two coils. One was 1.8Ω BVC coil and the other is 0.7Ω coil. I’ve been using the 1.8 and just wonder what the difference would be with the .7 I vape pretty low wattage, 7-11 and mtl 25 mg nicotine salt e juice. I think the .7 might be more for dtl-but what would be the difference be if you use it for mtl? Thanks in advance!!!
     
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  2. SupplyDaddy

    SupplyDaddy I'm considered a Mad Scientist in some circles! Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Supporting member
    Oct 21, 2012
    San Antonio, Texas
    You will have to bump your wattage up for .7 coil. My wife MTL's on .3 coils at about 24-27 watts.
    Just adjust your device until you get the feel you want.
     
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  3. uthinkofsomething

    uthinkofsomething Super Member ECF Veteran

    Jun 7, 2015
    Toledo, Ohio
    The .7 coil will produce more vapor at a slightly higher wattage setting, meant for a less restricted vape, more airflow. Not like a huge cloud setup, just a bit more than the 1.8 coil, and slightly warmer vape. If you feel like you want more than the 1.8 coil delivers, try the .7 coil, or wait til your 1.8 coil goes out and give it a shot.
    You can actually use both coils with similar results by using less (lower than it's maximum) power and restricting the airflow control when using the .7 coil. You just have to play around with it.
     
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  4. stara03

    stara03 Full Member

    Jul 21, 2018
    Awesome thanks! Very helpful, exactly what I was wondering.
     
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  5. Baditude

    Baditude ECF Guru ECF Veteran

    Apr 8, 2012
    Ridgeway, Ohio
    Lower Ohm Coils Will:
    • Heat The Coil Faster
    • Produce More Vapor
    • Drain The Battery Faster
    • Use E-Juice Faster
    • Produce A "Warmer" Tasting Vape
    Higher Ohm Coils Will:
    • Heat The Coil Slower
    • Produce Less Vapor
    • Provide A “Cooler” Tasting Vape
    • Use Less E-Juice
    • Prolong Battery Life
     
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  6. Shadav

    Shadav Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Jun 4, 2013
    Westfield, IN, USA
    to get the .7 ohm coil to work you will need to probably set your watts to around 30...20 maybe but more than likely 30w is going to be the lowest that it will fire at
     
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  7. VapePro

    VapePro Senior Member

    Sep 25, 2018
    This is assuming they use the same gauge wire in all there cartridges. Which. . . they most likely are.
     
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  8. sdennislee

    sdennislee Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Supporting member
    Nov 23, 2012
    Alaska
    Since the coils have a rated ohm value doesn't that take in to account for wire diameter. Other than perhaps ramp time. .2ohm whether its 24g or 30g is still going to drain the battery faster, burn more juice, produce a hotter vape, etc... than a .4ohm coil made of 26g or 28g.

    I don't get why wire diameter in a drop in coil would matter. Not sure I've ever seen the wire diameter listed for a drop in coil. They are sold by ohm, coil material (Kanthal, SS, etc..), coil style (Mesh, Wire, Ceramic, etc..)?

    Hopefully @Baditude will clear this up for me.
     
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  9. Baditude

    Baditude ECF Guru ECF Veteran

    Apr 8, 2012
    Ridgeway, Ohio
    To the best of MY knowledge, wire diameter or gauge in general doesn't really matter for drop in coils. As you said, the manufacturer and product specification pages don't typically list the wire diameter used.

    The little "higher ohm vs lower ohm" characteristics I provided above should have said "generally speaking..." as I'm sure there must be exceptions.
     
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  10. VapePro

    VapePro Senior Member

    Sep 25, 2018
    "Drop in coil" ? You just made up your own vape lingo, lol. I googled it and nothing came up. Vape glossary

    I know what you're talking about though. Unfortunately I think Im going to burst @Baditude @sdennislee your bubble. It doesn't matter what or where the coil is made or comes from. More metal, I.E. wire gauge, takes longer to heat up. Which means your also holding down the button longer, and that uses more battery.

    References:
    Question about resistance and ramp up time : electronic_cigarette
    coils and resistance vs heatup time
     
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  11. sdennislee

    sdennislee Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Supporting member
    Nov 23, 2012
    Alaska
    Drop in coil is a common term used here at ECF.

    Here is a link to the forum section that discusses Drop In Coils Tanks, clearomizers and drop-in coils. I found it with Google.

    Doesn't bust my bubble we can just agree to disagree.

    I acknowledged ramp up time in my post as the only possible difference. Ramp up time is so minimal it's impact on battery life is negligible.

    The characteristics posted by @batitude other than possibly ramp up time are valid to answer this question.
     
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  12. uthinkofsomething

    uthinkofsomething Super Member ECF Veteran

    Jun 7, 2015
    Toledo, Ohio
    It will fire much lower actually. Just looked at my wife's Zelos and it's at 11.2 watts lol. She'll go up to 17ish, but I think most are using the .7 coil closer to 20 as a norm.
     
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  13. Jebbn

    Jebbn Super Member

    Apr 2, 2018
    Australia
    I use the 0.7 @ between 12.5w and 13.8w and as low as 10w, Aspire rate it from 18w and up to 23w.
    18w is about my limit with the 0.7 for my draw style, I tend to chain vape and take quite strong draws and the 0.7 gets a bit too warm.
    I like the 1.8 and 1.6 coils with the Nautilus 2 tank that comes with the Zelos mod.
     
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  14. DaveP

    DaveP PV Master & Musician ECF Veteran

    Supporting member
    May 22, 2010
    Central GA
    I wind 28ga 2.5mm coils and vape at anywhere from .5 ohms to 1 ohm. Wattage settings will change the coil voltage to compensate for resistance, but heat flux varies with wire diameter. It takes more voltage to heat up a lower (thicker) gauge wire and maintain the vape. That makes TC mode more accurate when various gauge coils are used because heat is controlled by TC for any particular temp setting. TC mode picks the voltage that produces the temp you dial in.

    In wattage mode you adjust your wattage to suit your individual vapor output to taste. It may take more or less power to produce the right heat for a given coil.

    Whether you use factory coils or wind your own, wattage performance is the same. Start with the wattage shown on the coil package and tweak it up or down to suit your vapor and flavor requirements. The wattage on the coil pack is intended to be a starting point.
     
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  15. stols001

    stols001 Mistress of the Dark Nicotinic Arts Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Supporting member
    May 30, 2017
    Tucson, AZ
    I'm not the hugest fan of the 0.7 coil but in a tank like the Nautilus where the airflow is so small as is the chimney, you can most certainly get a satisfying vape at far below 20 watts, in fact I used to routinely vape mine only a few watts higher than the 1.8 coil. I think you really should just prime it like you would any other coil and well, see where you end up, and how you like it. You may hate or LOVE the coil who knows, but there is certainly no "preset amount" of wattage you NEED and anyone saying otherwise is either wrong, or just talking about their OWN preference. I've vaped it as high as 20 but did in no way find it necessary.

    My favorite Nautilus coil is the 1.6 I find it to be the perfect balance. Doesn't come with the N2, though, you'd have to purchase a box separately.

    I think it's just one more version of the "Capitalizing on the slightly sub0hm nature of the MTL market" to be honest. I did not love it OR hate it. To confuse matters further the Nautilus 2s is now coming with an 0.4 coil I have NO CLUE how it will vape, but I'm interested.

    Anna
     
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  16. Baditude

    Baditude ECF Guru ECF Veteran

    Apr 8, 2012
    Ridgeway, Ohio
    You know what, @VapePro? You are exactly right! And you even proved your point with a link to a reference. I'm impressed.

    My only defense to my simple answer above was the OP appeared to be a relatively new vaper asking for a simple answer to a commonly asked question around here by novices. If there's one thing that I have learned by serving this community for many years is try not to overwhelm newcomers initially with too much information and in particular no information that doesn't apply to their question, but in addition provide a link to one or more of my blogs or other links should they desire more info.

    IMHO, wire gauge or coil thickness and ramp up time really only comes into play unless one is rebuilding their own coils, and the OP doesn't fall in that category based upon what he said he had used.

    And the term "drop in coil" has been around for a few years now, ever since clearomizers with replaceable coils first came onto the market. Especially on this forum.
     
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  17. Jebbn

    Jebbn Super Member

    Apr 2, 2018
    Australia
    iJoy make a 0.5 coil for the Elf which is basically a Naut2, wide open on the air flow and as a restricted DL that 0.5 was too hot for me. As a mtl coil on restricted airflow I pretty much just burnt them out in a few hours :) I never restocked them.
     
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  18. DaveP

    DaveP PV Master & Musician ECF Veteran

    Supporting member
    May 22, 2010
    Central GA
    That's true, but the manufacturer's suggested coil wattage setting should put him in the mid range or designed wattage for the coil (assuming the manufacturer does relevant testing). That may vary with air flow, so user tweaking will tailor the individual vape to preference.
     
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  19. Punk In Drublic

    Punk In Drublic Ultra Member

    Aug 28, 2018
    Toronto, ON
    In a regulated mod that allows adjustability, the resistance of a coil has no factor on whether the vape is warm or not. One can achieve a cool vape with a low resistance coil just as one can achieve a warm or hot vape with a high resistance coil. The coil must reach an optimum temperature in order to vaporize the juice. Power is adjusted to reach that temperature based on the resistance of the coil, so lower the resistance the higher the required power and vice versa. If 210 °C (410 °F) is your preferred temperature, this can be achieved regardless of the resistance.

    One can use Steam Engine to see this in action. A 2ohm coil may only require 11 watts to achieve a Heat Flux of 200 mW/mm². However, a 0.2ohm coil, of obvious different gauge, will require 36 watts to achieve that same 200 mW/mm² Heat Flux. This is just an example.

    With a mechanical mod we do not have the luxury of adjusting the output like we do with a regulated. Therefore, the resistance of the coil will be a factor on how warm or cool your vape is. One can refer to ohms law to determine what that power output will be.
     
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  20. BrotherBob

    BrotherBob ECF Guru ECF Veteran

    Dec 24, 2014
    Sunnyvale,CA,USA
    Your welcome in advanced. Might go with the one that gives you the best vaping experience.
    Responding to each reply can be daunting. If you choose, you can click "like" (the thumbs up) icon,or other icons, at bottom right hand corner of this post, this action will notify the respondent of your following "shorthand" response.
    Could fill in your location, it may help you in obtaining location specific information to your question(s).
    On the top right hand corner of this post you will find --"your name" next to "Inbox and Alerts"
    Place the mouse pointer on your name. You will get a drop down and on the left hand side of this drop down you will find "Personal Details". Click Personal Details.
    In Personal Details, in middle of screen in gray, you will find "Location" Could fill that box line in.
    re: New users - Put your location in your Profile...
     
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