The costs of running this huge site are paid for by ads. Please consider registering and becoming a Supporting Member for an ad-free experience. Thanks, ECF team.

My understanding of regulated mods.

Discussion in 'General Vaping Discussion' started by H4X0R, Jun 12, 2016.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Image has been removed.
URL has been removed.
Email address has been removed.
Media has been removed.
  1. H4X0R

    H4X0R Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Jul 4, 2014
    NM
    So I've been brushing up on regulated mods, and this is my understanding. Using the RX200 as an example, 3 18650s. If I was to use 3 batteries that have an amp rating of 20amps, firing it at 150w would be an amp draw of 15.625 per battery correct? (150w/3batteries/3.2 minimum voltage of battery) Firing it at 200w would be 20.833 amps? (200w/3batteries/3.2 minimum voltage of battery) Now these numbers are just for figures, I know you NEVER wanna max your batteries like that or go within 80% of it's limit, but this is just for educational purposes at the moment. Now if all here is correct so far, where does the resistance enter this equation? That's what I'm unsure of. For that matter, do most regulated mods know when to cut you off before your battery is over drained? Or is this something you yourself, the user has to keep note of? Thanks guys! This is all new to me, I'm used to my unregulated mod which is so much more simple.
     
  2. Baditude

    Baditude ECF Guru ECF Veteran

    Apr 8, 2012
    Ridgeway, Ohio
    Calculating battery current draw for a regulated mod

    Resistance makes no difference with a regulated mod.

    "Calculating the current being drawn from the batteries in a regulated device can be very confusing. You can't do it the same way as you would for a mechanical/unregulated device and there are so many different battery configurations; single, dual parallel, dual series, triple series, etc.

    The way I keep it all sorted out is to remember that, in a regulated mod, the coil isn't connected to the battery. The regulator is. To calculate the current being drawn from each battery when using variable-wattage (VW) mode you need to calculate the maximum wattage each battery supplies.

    Here's how I do it...
    As an example, the Reuleaux has a maximum wattage rating of 200W. Since it uses three batteries that means each battery supplies 200W / 3 = 67W.

    Once you have the maximum wattage for each battery then you can use the following formula to determine the maximum amount of current that can be drawn from each battery...

    Max Amps Per Battery = Max Wattage Per Battery / Minimum Voltage Per Battery

    For the Reuleaux the minimum possible cutoff voltage is 9.0V, which is 3.0V per battery (unless you set the cutoff higher)." --- Mooch
     
    • Like Like x 3
  3. rice721

    rice721 1.21 GigaWatts! Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Feb 26, 2016
    Shanghai
    Yes. Your calculations are correct, but don't forget to factor in the efficiency of a board which is normally around 85-97%, I take 90% as the average. So you would multiply 3.2V which is the soft cut-off by 0.90.

    The resistance only plays a factor in how much power is needed to get the vape you want in a regulated mod. So I guess indirectly you can also say its a factor to what CDR is necessary.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. H4X0R

    H4X0R Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Jul 4, 2014
    NM
    Taking the boards efficiency into consideration, I would use something like 2.8v as it's "minimum" just to be on the safe side? And as for the resistance, theoretically, it would be okay to use an atomizer as low as the device can handle? Let's say a 0.15 ohm atty for instance, this would be safe to use and not really throw off the calculations at all? Higher resistance would just give less vapor and take more power to get a good vape?
     
  5. H4X0R

    H4X0R Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Jul 4, 2014
    NM
    Taking rice721's advice on board efficiency, setting the minimum cut off to about 8.4v to 8.3v would be smart? Because I'm thinking, to stay on the safe side and taking the efficiency into consideration, having the cut off lower would be a safer route correct?
     
  6. Bunnykiller

    Bunnykiller ECF Guru Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Nov 17, 2013
    New Orleans La.
    regulated mods dont "look" at the resistance per say... it looks at current draw and voltage supplied to control the settings...
    this is why regulated works so well at keeping your atty at 45W ( for example) for a wide range of resistances. Basically you can have several attys with different coils ( different resistances) and swap them out and the mod will do 45W on all of them ( since you set the mod to 45W)
    the firmware (code) in the mod will be designed to protect the mod and board, it has its limits and will either give an error code or not function when those limits have been reached of exceeded.

    So if one decides to use cheap batteries with a low CDR, and one puts a low ohm coil on the mod ( low enuf to draw more amps than can be supplied) the voltage drop that occurs from a hi current draw will cause the mod to register a low battery condition and "shut down".... which basically protects the battery... but, why suffer the constant error codes/turn offs? get some decent batteries and keep your ohms above .2 or higher... :)
     
  7. Baditude

    Baditude ECF Guru ECF Veteran

    Apr 8, 2012
    Ridgeway, Ohio
    As much as I am a safety advocate, I believe you are overthinking the safety aspect of a regulated mod.

    The processor is not going to do anything which will harm itself, which indirectly means it will not do anything which will harm the batteries or you. Essentually, when confronted with a potentially dangerous situation, it will alert you on the display screen and refuse to fire the atomizer.

    Relax and just vape. :vapor:
     
    • Like Like x 3
  8. rice721

    rice721 1.21 GigaWatts! Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Feb 26, 2016
    Shanghai
    As long as the mod is able to handle said resistance and it is a regulated mod, you are safe. Enjoy your vape :)
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. H4X0R

    H4X0R Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Jul 4, 2014
    NM
    I figured I was lol my forte is Android and Linux modding and stuff, so I definitely tend to get over technical about everything for sure lol Also never handled a regulated mod so no idea what the boards are actually capable of, thanks guys for the advice! All very helpful and is much appreciated! ;)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. tj99959

    tj99959 ECF Guru ECF Veteran

    Aug 13, 2011
    utah
    Sure is easy to calculate what I can do (can't do) with a mechanical. .... just sayin'.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Eskie

    Eskie ECF Guru Verified Member ECF Veteran

    May 6, 2016
    NY
    Those boards are pretty capable these days. You can even get one from Joytech with a game mode so you can play Flappy Bird. Really. As already stated, regulated mods these days are quite safe.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. aceman3330

    aceman3330 Super Member ECF Veteran

    Wow, this is, for me, quite confusing. Can I just keep my voltage between 3.7-4.2 and be done with it? Although, just to prove what a "regulated" mod should do, I tried pushing my RX200 as high as it will go (I've updated it to 250 watts and vape that high once on my other rda, lol) and this is as far as the mod would allow my build to go:
    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  13. H4X0R

    H4X0R Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Jul 4, 2014
    NM
    So the board should set the limits FOR you and not let you go higher than the batteries should? You have to keep in mind, I never owned one. My current device is unregulated.
     
  14. bwh79

    bwh79 Vaping Master Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Dec 11, 2014
    Oregon
    Not necessarily. In voltage mode you will need to use the resistance of your atty to determine the wattage (or just read it off the screen if it's still displayed while in voltage mode), and then divide that wattage by the batteries' charge state (current voltage) to find what the amp draw is at. You can still get yourself into trouble even at 4v or less if you put something like a .05 resistance on it. That's gonna try to pull like 320 watts (or as many as the device can dish out) which would be over 35A per battery on a triple-battery device like your RX200. Try that with a set of 20A cells, and you're gonna have a bad time.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. 7sixtwo

    7sixtwo Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Aug 5, 2013
    the hinterlands
    There is no "voltage mode" on the Reuleaux. In wattage mode, the lowest it will fire is 0.1 ohm. Only in TC modes will it will fire down to 0.05. This entire thread is about being overcautious and misunderstanding what modern regulated mods can do, although you will want to use 30A batteries if you're planning to go >150W regularly. Few people find vaping that hot very pleasant, though.
     
  16. 7sixtwo

    7sixtwo Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Aug 5, 2013
    the hinterlands
    Yes, the mod is limited to 9V, which is 172W at a resistance that high.
     
  17. bwh79

    bwh79 Vaping Master Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Dec 11, 2014
    Oregon
    I've no hands-on experience with that particular device, but my answer was in response to the general question of "can I just keep my voltage between [range] and be done with it?" And the answer is no, battery safety is not as simple as "just set it here and be done with it."
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice