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Where do I start?

Discussion in 'Rebuildable Atomizer Systems' started by Kittyntwinstarz, Mar 5, 2018.

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  1. Kittyntwinstarz

    Kittyntwinstarz Senior Member Verified Member

    Feb 8, 2018
    California, USA
    Looks like it’s time for me to build. I used to do RDA before I quit 4 yrs ago. I loved the longevity of coil but hated dripping every few min. Since then RTA has evolved and I have no clue how that works.

    Also can should I buy a deck for one of my current tanks (Smok big baby beast, Smok Prince, Uwell Crown, Tobeco) or will I need a special tank for optimum performance.
     
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  2. AzPlumber

    AzPlumber Vaping Master Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Aug 28, 2011
    Arizona
    Best bet is to get a RTA, the decks are typically bigger and much easier to build on than the smaller RBA heads.
     
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  3. sonicbomb

    sonicbomb Vaping Master Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Feb 17, 2015
    1187 Hunterwasser
    An RTA (rebuildable Tank Atomiser) is essentially an RDA submerged in a tank of eliquid. You can also get and RDTA (Rebuildable Dripping Tank Atomiser) which is an RDA with a small tank under it. You then drip or allow the wicks to draw juice up from the reservoir below.

    Your BBB should already have come with a rebuildable deck. I have one that I use everyday, in fact I'm vaping one right now.

    Should you fancy an RDTA I recommend the Cthulu Gaia.
    GAIA RDTA (The balance of cloud and flavor) – CTHULHU MOD -Top Innovations for Vaping
     
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  4. untar

    untar Ultra Member

    Feb 7, 2018
    Germany
    So you want to build. I take it you're on the more open draw side from the atties you listed.
    I'd suggest a single coil RTA, like the geekvape zeus, the digiflavor pharaoh mini (if you can get past that it was designed by rip trippers it's preeetty good) or the digiflavor fuji (basically an open draw Siren).
     
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  5. bombastinator

    bombastinator Vaping Master Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 12, 2010
    MN USA
    Things to know moving from an RDA to RTAs
    Each rta has a very specific way to wick it that isn’t particularly forgiving of error. You need to watch a build video or two for that RTA so you know how to do it. RDTAs are mor forgiving, usually anyway.
     
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  6. madstabber

    madstabber Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    I’d recommend a single coil because it’s less to troubleshoot therefore more chance of success. Wicking is the hardest part but with a little patience is fairly easy to figure out. I have the Asmodus Zesthia and it is easy to build and wick and produces great flavor. Try rayon and cotton, I prefer rayon but you may differ. Patience is the biggest thing but once you have a particular tank figured out you will get a great vape.
     
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  7. stols001

    stols001 Mistress of the Dark Nicotinic Arts Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Supporting member
    May 30, 2017
    Tucson, AZ
    Well the best place to start is by figuring out an RTA that might suit your vaping preferences, and you are getting some good suggestions. I think some of your tanks might have build decks, but they tend to be small, difficult to build on, and really don't provide "the best" RTA experience since the tanks are really designed primarily for drop in coils. With that said, since you have built before you could try using a build deck in a tank you have, but most folks wind up a bit disappointed in the experience.

    I started with single coil, large decks. I know the Engine series of RTDAs are well liked as they are easy to wick, and don't tend to leak, and give great flavor. You can get a single coil Engine. A lot of folks swear by them, although I believe the juice well is smaller. If you want to go to a true, larger capacity RTA, yes, watching some reviews (more for figuring out how to build them) is a good idea, it will help you figure out what builds may work well for you, wicking and etc., and what things to watch out for. Also, plenty of folks will be willing to help along the way. LOL, my first build was completed with ECF cliffnotes, I don't think I would have gotten it done otherwise.

    Basically, you need wick and wire of your choice. I think primarily people are using cotton and rayon these days (lots of options). I personally find rayon more forgiving than cotton and I don't have to replace as often as it withstands heat better than cotton, and it's a relatively forgiving wick. But plenty of folks love and use cotton as well, plenty of types to choose from.

    If you feel you need it, a coilmaster kit can be helpful, but it's not actually necessary. Plenty of folks test their build on a regulated mod, although I do enjoy having an ohm's reader to build on as I have a fine motor tremor and having a stable base is super helpful (for me). I coil, wick, fill and test the tank on it, before transferring it to my (far more expensive mods). I've leaked all over mine several times, and it just keeps on going. An ohm's reader isn't necessarily going to be more accurate than a mod at reading resistance, though, so if you feel you don't need as many "tools" as are in the kit, really you just need something you can use to wind around that you know the diameter of. That could be as simple as a screwdriver. Ceramic tweezers are useful and I actually use most of the tools in my coilmaster kit, although they aren't super high quality, they are useful.

    Finally, you may want to check out steam-engine.org, it will give you the ability to select the best wire for the vape you are looking for (e.g. stainless steel or kanthal, what gauge of wire, and help you "target" the resistance you want to build the coil. But, you can also get premade coils of different metal types and resistances if that appeals to you. Coils can last a long time. Wicking is typically more frequent.

    But overall it is much less expensive to rewick with a bit of cotton or rayon, if you are using super sweet or super dark, gunky juices.

    There's kind of learning curve but given that you've built before, you really should decide what you "need" to get started and go from there.

    Best of luck

    Anna
     
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  8. Kittyntwinstarz

    Kittyntwinstarz Senior Member Verified Member

    Feb 8, 2018
    California, USA
    So my BBB came with my pro color mod and did not have a rebuildable deck. I will look into that. Thank you.
     
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  9. Kittyntwinstarz

    Kittyntwinstarz Senior Member Verified Member

    Feb 8, 2018
    California, USA
    Define wicking if you will. When I had an RDA I would build and insert the coil then add hemp wicking material which I loved at the time then added juice and vaped. It was pretty easy. Is wicking with RTA different?
     
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  10. Kittyntwinstarz

    Kittyntwinstarz Senior Member Verified Member

    Feb 8, 2018
    California, USA
    As always you are extremely informative. Thank you!
     
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  11. untar

    untar Ultra Member

    Feb 7, 2018
    Germany
    Yes, in contrast to an RDA there is one more factor in an RTA: juice supply.
    The wick has to balance a pressure differential between the tank and the atomizer chamber. Too little and the tank can leak. Too much and air can't get through to equalize pressure, juice won't flow freely and you'll get dry hits.
    Sounds scary if you never did it but in most attys nowadays you have a pretty big window (there's exceptions though, there's tanks that don't forgive errors).
     
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  12. bombastinator

    bombastinator Vaping Master Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 12, 2010
    MN USA
    Iirc the bbb deck bought separately costs what a whole rta does so there may not be an easy out there
     
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  13. bombastinator

    bombastinator Vaping Master Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 12, 2010
    MN USA
    yes. this feeds into the correct wicking issue and why you may want to watch a wicking video for the tank you wind up with. The wicking itself isn’t particularly hard or unususal. You just need to know how much wick to use and how to apply it. The videos generally provide this information which makes things fairly simple.
     
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  14. Kittyntwinstarz

    Kittyntwinstarz Senior Member Verified Member

    Feb 8, 2018
    California, USA
    Geez this seems more complex then I thought. I’ll have to start watching videos!!
     
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  15. mackman

    mackman Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Aug 19, 2013
    NorCal
    Watch a couple of videos on wicking and with minimal practice you will have mastered it.
    If you don't want to start out wrapping coils FT has tons of options for cheap and I have found that the SS coils are uniform and work very well.
    FastTech - Gadgets and Electronics
     
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  16. bombastinator

    bombastinator Vaping Master Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 12, 2010
    MN USA
    Don’t stress too much. Cooking eggs, for example, is fiendishly complex chemically, but fairly simple procedurally. Deep learning is useful but not required.
     
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  17. Don29palms

    Don29palms Ultra Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 12, 2014
    joshua tree, ca
    If you like RDAs but also like the convenience of a tank an RDTA might be a good option for you. If you can't build coils yet you can buy prebuilt coils. Wicking is an art but you'll pick that up real quick.
     
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  18. bombastinator

    bombastinator Vaping Master Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 12, 2010
    MN USA
    I concur. They tend to be more forgiving wicking wise and there are several that are really leak resistant. The trade off is they tend not to hold as much liquid. The avacado might be a good one (NOT the bottom air, the regular one. The bottom air has issues)
     
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  19. madstabber

    madstabber Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    @untar has explained it better than I could. I wouldn’t stress about wicking though it’s not as hard as it sounds. Basically too much cotton in the juice holes and it won’t wick well giving you dry hits, not enough and it will leak. The area in between the two is the sweet spot and once you get it right you sorta know how much density is required for an RTA to run properly. It’s a feel thing, I poke at the cotton, or rayon in my case, with my tweezers and I know how hard or soft it should feel. Like suggested earlier watching videos of people building and wicking whatever tank you choose will give you a good idea of what to do. Just fill the tank maybe halfway after your first build and have a bottle ready to dump your juice into if your tank is leaking and put more cotton. Same thing goes if it’s too much cotton. You’ll get dry hits, so dump your juice back into a bottle pull the cotton and try again. I hope I’ve helped to make it sound less daunting, it’s really an easy task that with a little time and patience will reward you with the satisfaction of a superior vape that you have total control of. Good luck, you’re gonna do great.
     
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