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Why sub-ohm on a DNA device?

Discussion in 'VV/VW APV Discussion' started by Gunner83, May 9, 2014.

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  1. Gunner83

    Gunner83 Super Member ECF Veteran

    Oct 31, 2012
    US
    I understand sub-ohming on a mech, since you are dealing with limited, non-variable power. So you have to sub-ohm, to get into the higher watts.

    But on something like a DNA chipped device, do sub-ohm builds still offer an advantage of any kind? Will my vape experience be different with a .5ohm coil on my DNA set at 30 watts, vs a 1.5ohm coil on the same device set at 30 watts?
     
  2. AnsonJames

    AnsonJames Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Jun 23, 2011
    IRELAND
    Technically there shouldn't be difference should there?

    Don't really get the whole sub-ohm thing myself, I find it quite painful to inhale but then I guess I'm just an old fart .
     
  3. alee132

    alee132 Senior Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Mar 25, 2014
    United States
    I am getting one to use my kayfuns (non-sub-ohm). Also I would like to use my drippers on it which I use on my mech's anywhere from .6-.9. So I would be able to use them on a VW device (dna30) without having to switch out the coils everytime I want to use a dripper on one or the other. Also you kinda need to use sub ohm to take advantage of the 30 watts. I cannot even go up to 22 watts on my seven 22 with a normal clearo or carto or kayfun build. So in order to use all 30 watts on a dna 30 it's easier to do with a sub ohm. Also you have the advantage of doing sub ohm without having battery drop off of a mech. I don't get people that don't sub ohm on a dna 30 at all... Opposite of you guys I guess. Unless you are a pro tank clearo only type of guy. In which case why even get a dna30. Why not a mvp or something cheaper that doesn't have 30 watts to it. Because good luck trying to use those toppers without burning up your wicks and juice's.
     
  4. KurrptSenate

    KurrptSenate Vaping Master Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Oct 9, 2013
    PA
    if you want to heat the coil faster it's good I suppose
     
  5. Gunner83

    Gunner83 Super Member ECF Veteran

    Oct 31, 2012
    US
    Of course you couldn't use a normal clearo or carto at those high wattages.

    What I'm asking is, what are the benefits of sub-ohming on a DNA device? You say "You need to sub-ohm to take advantage of the 30 watts". How so? 30 watts on a 1.5ohm build is 30 watts on a .5ohm build. What's the difference?

    A specific example; I build my dripper with dual coils that come out to .5ohms. Then I build another dripper at 1.5ohms. I fire both at 30 watts. What difference am I going to see? They're both giving me 30 watts.
     
  6. blueGrassTubb

    blueGrassTubb Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Mar 21, 2014
    The Bluegrass
    The difference is the battery is outputting vastly different voltages with those two atomizers.

    In your examples:

    If you set your DNA (or whatever regulated MOD you have) to 30W with a 1.5Ω build, the battery will be discharging 6.71v to the atomizer, which will likely be way too hot a vape for the vast majority of people. With a .5Ω atomizer set at 30W, the MOD will discharge just 3.87v to the atomizer, which is likely too cool a vape for many (if not most) people.

    When sub-Ωing you need to have higher wattages so that you can have adequate voltages in order to fire the coil at a good temperature for vaping.

    Were you to lower the resistance of that atomizer even more to .3Ω, it's unlikely that the coil will even fire because the MOD would be discharging just 3v from the battery if it's set at 30W. A DNA device (or any other without step-down circuitry) won't fire it at all.

    But perhaps even more importantly, sub-Ωers (and those who don't sub-Ω) like regulated devices because they provide a smooth, robust, consistent vape throughout the entire charge of the battery from the time you pop it in until it gets cut off at 3.2v.
     
  7. Gunner83

    Gunner83 Super Member ECF Veteran

    Oct 31, 2012
    US
    No. Watts are the end goal. It doesn't matter what the voltage is. That just gets you to the desired watts. That's how ohms law works. 30 watts, regardless of how you get there by adjusting your ohms and volts, is 30 watts. You don't adjust watts to get to a certain voltage in an ecig.

    Your theory of 30 watts on a 1.5ohm coil being too hot, and 30 watts on a .5ohm coil being too cool, are off base. PLENTY of people run those #'s, and can be seen in a ton of YouTube videos.
     
  8. andthatsalright

    andthatsalright Full Member

    Dec 9, 2013
    Southern California
    Simply put: You sub-ohm on a DNA for the same reason you sub-ohm on a mechanical mod. It provides the best clouds and flavor. You buy a DNA in the first place because it provides a consistent experience throughout the life of the battery.

    Edit: Also, with a mechanical mod, on a fresh battery @ 4.2V, you can't hit 30 watts until ~ .59 ohms. So anything above that, you're going to see better performance from a DNA30.
     
  9. 300fury

    300fury Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Apr 6, 2013
    Rochester mn usa
    Run a 1.5 ohm coil at 30 watts and let me know how that works out, the burnt taste and what not, yes the voltage output affects the vape
     
  10. 300fury

    300fury Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Apr 6, 2013
    Rochester mn usa
    Just a quick question at gunner 83, not trying to argue but do you own a DNA 30??? When you fire the device it will display on the screen what voltage it is putting out to achieve the wattage you have set. I tried a 1.6 ohm coil at 30 watts and it was like smoking burning cotton, however I fired 30 watts at a .8 ohm coil and it performed well. Same device(kayfun) just telling my experience
     
  11. EDO

    EDO Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Feb 15, 2009
    Guys its not only about the watts/volts and ohms as much as it about the temperature of the wire....and the temperature of the wire also depends on the gauge of the wire. You can make a coil with 26g wire at 0.5ohms and vape it at 30 watts and have a cool vape. You can make a 32g/34g coil at anywhere from 0.5ohms to 3ohms and vape it at 15 watts (forget going to 30 watts) and obliterate any juice you put in the atty.

    So going back to OPs question...I see your point that you don't need to go subohm with a DNA 30 device. Some people are used to using 26g wire but it really isn't necessary (maybe counter productive) in a DNA 30 device. I would most likely use 28g or 30g wire and make my builds above 1 ohm and use the variable wattage feature to chuck the vapor. But other's are also correct in stating it doesn't make sense to use a DNA 30 device if you prefer to use coils made with 32g/34g (usually higher resistant coils)....since every juice will burn above 15 watts in these coils. Of course this is all assuming we are talking about single coil builds. If you prefer dual coil...you pretty much have to stay at 1 ohm and below with dual coils even using 30g wire.
     
  12. EDO

    EDO Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Feb 15, 2009
    Sorry...double post.
     
  13. EDO

    EDO Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Feb 15, 2009
    Whats wrong with this site...triple post.
     
  14. dr g

    dr g Moved On ECF Veteran

    Mar 12, 2012
    Paradise
    OP: The only reason to run subohm on a DNA is if you have a very specific build that you want to run, that can only run at subohm. This is very very limited and in most cases there is no reason at all to subohm on a DNA. That is one of the greatest "secrets" of high-voltage, high-power vaping.

    In my case the only build I must run at subohm is my Immortalizer with ribbon kanthal -- the coil space is too short and narrow to make a ribbon coil that is not subohm. I really wish it was larger, so I wasn't restricted like this.

    IMO it's actually inadvisable to run subohm on DNAs, if you don't have to, by means of large-diameter wire. The ability to run small-diameter wire and achieve fast heating at high wattage is a huge benefit of high-voltage regulation.

    This is entirely on your build. I have done plenty of coils that take 30 watts at 1.6 ohms, or you could do a dual 3.0 ohm. They keys are coil mass, wicking, and airflow.
     
  15. slappy3139

    slappy3139 Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Apr 8, 2013
    New Iberia, LA, USA
    Sigh, so many misconceptions on this thread, I don't quite know what to say. Everybody talking about watts and volts and subohm, and not considering current at all. 30 watts on subohm coil gonna burn through your battery much faster than 30 watts on a higher ohm coil. Watts is an electrical output parameter which is pretty much a measure of heat energy produced.
     
  16. slappy3139

    slappy3139 Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Apr 8, 2013
    New Iberia, LA, USA
    What you are saying here is true, but its not just the temperature of the wire, but also on the smaller diameter wire, there is going to be a lot less surface area of the coil(vs a coil of the same resistance of a larger diameter wire) in contact with your wick, which makes wicking fluid to your coils more difficult.
     
  17. Gunner83

    Gunner83 Super Member ECF Veteran

    Oct 31, 2012
    US
    I'm not sure I buy that. You sub-ohm on a mechanical to get the wattages up to a desired level. With a DNA, you can just hit the power-up button to get the same result, regardless of the ohms of the coil.
     
  18. Gunner83

    Gunner83 Super Member ECF Veteran

    Oct 31, 2012
    US
    I do not. I have one on the way, which is why I'm asking why bother sub-ohming. So far, I haven't seen any real answers.

    And your experience doesn't mirror what I've seen before.
     
  19. Gunner83

    Gunner83 Super Member ECF Veteran

    Oct 31, 2012
    US
    This makes sense, and I understand sub-ohming with a dual coil, since it's either that, or build longer coils.
     
  20. Gunner83

    Gunner83 Super Member ECF Veteran

    Oct 31, 2012
    US
    Thanks for all the info, everyone.

    It looks like there really isn't a need, except for the convenience when running dual coils. I will probably keep my single coil Kayfuns around 1.5ohms and my dual coil drippers around .9, like normal.
     
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