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How to see if your atomizer is truly dead with a Voltmeter

Discussion in 'Atomizer Issues' started by Stormynights, Jul 12, 2009.

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  1. klm

    klm Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Aug 16, 2009
    Boston, MA
    WOW, Thanks 4 that infor!
     
  2. acezzz

    acezzz Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 19, 2009
    If you have followed all the cleaning recommendations in these forums for attys and it still doesnt work, then it is truly dead. I really dont think an ohmmeter is going to help. But if you like to play with them it cant really hurt anything. If you get an atty that is doa when you get it, then send it back immediately.
     
  3. LameBMX

    LameBMX Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 4, 2009
    Stow, OH
    ohmmeter is easier than time spent cleaning. It isnt hitting so test it, infinite ohms == open ckt == no current flow == no heat == no amount of cleaning will save it.

    Proper (or close)resistance == closed ckt == current flow. it may just be worth the effort to clean away.
     
  4. Frostmonkey

    Frostmonkey Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Oct 31, 2009
    Joliet, IL
    After reading all this and testing a 510 Joye atomizer, I'm still a bit confused. I know how to use a Voltmeter (roughly), I'm using an old needle style Craftsman 82401 model and I'm getting a 0 reading from my atomizer. Even when I adjust the base level up to one, I touch the probes to the atty and the needle jumps to one.

    I don't have another to test right now as I'm waiting for a batch of replacements. So, does that reading mean the atty is dead? If so, why does it still vape? :p The atty is a month old and definitely doesn't produce the vapor it did so I was expecting some sort of read...
     
  5. LameBMX

    LameBMX Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 4, 2009
    Stow, OH
    If it is still producing vapor, it should read something. It has been ages since I have used an analog meter, so i am no help there.
     
  6. goodolick

    goodolick New Member

    Dec 3, 2009
    in that place
    So my atomizer died and I did the resistance test. My atty outputted a resistance of 13 kOhms. I figured this was better then a completley broken circuit, so I thought that it might just need to be cleaned. After a 2 hour soak in rubbing alcohol, I then dried it up with some canned air. The atty still would not fire and I then tested it again. Now it seems to be a broken circuit because I am reading 14 MOhms. Any ideas? Can you take one apart and fix the short? I am far from someplace I can buy a new one and dont want to go back to analogs.
     
  7. Frostmonkey

    Frostmonkey Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Oct 31, 2009
    Joliet, IL
    Unless you have a soldering table, something to dissolve the glue holding everything together, glue to put everything back together, no. It's dead. Even if you were to take it apart and reset the connections on the coil resistance would still be high as most likely the coil itself it what has degraded.

    I might be wrong, if so someone please correct me :p...I just have never seen or heard anyone restore an atty without the use of harsh acids and the replacement of wire connections.

    I did read somewhere (here I think) that hooking up an atty to a 5v power source and burning hydrogen peroxide can restore an atty. If you try it, well, try to find that thread first, and make sure to flush very well.

    *If you haven't read this thread also http://www.e-cigarette-forum.com/forum/experiments-equipment/35917-sattecs-atty-cleaning-test-thread.html
     
  8. LameBMX

    LameBMX Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 4, 2009
    Stow, OH
    14 MΩ is basically an open circuit (air gap circuit, which we don't employ here)
    And the best theory I have heard so far for a 13KΩ reading, is your reading the resistance of gunk and juice in the atty, the nichrome heating element itself is open, but the gunk completes the circuit.

    and for the record of this thread ... I got a bunk 510 atty thats at 4.9Ω It is not functional at all.
     
  9. LameBMX

    LameBMX Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 4, 2009
    Stow, OH
    If you understand resistance welding (or soldering weird metals), have access to jewelers tools and a jewelers steady hands (or the time and patience). It appears most of the time the nichrome wire (heating element) and copper wire (element to connector) solder connection fails. Rebuilding may be possible. There is already a thread devoted to that.
     
  10. ZorbaTheGreek

    ZorbaTheGreek Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Oct 26, 2009
    I had a atty today that after a bath it stopped working. Just totally dead. I didn't bother to check resistance, but I did check continuity. Liquid/juice in the atty was completing the circuit. This would keep the atty from doing anything at all. Seeming dead. So, I heated the thing up, held it in some pliers and warmed it. Not too hot, didn't want to damage anything, but hot enough. Did this a couple times and it's up and running again :)
     
  11. invisiblewardog

    invisiblewardog Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 23, 2009
    Virginia, USA
    Another tip: many voltmeters have very low amp tolerance so testing the current output of your batteries can pop the fuse in your device or it will simply display an out of range error. You can still figure out the current of your battery using V = IR (voltage = current * resistance)

    For example, if you know your battery puts out 3.6V and your atomizer has 4 ohms resistance, the current is 3.6V/4ohms ~ just shy of 1 amp. To make it simple, if you get 3.6V over 3.6ohms of resistance, you are getting 1 amp. If your battery is rated for 500mAh, then your battery can handle about 30 minutes of discharge with your atty. (500 mA is .5A)

    If you take 5-second drags, then you should, in theory, get about 360 drags before your battery goes dead. Granted, you will see a decrease in performance before that happens.
     
  12. LameBMX

    LameBMX Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 4, 2009
    Stow, OH
    And as the battery goes dead, there is less "charge to the battery" its voltage will be lower. This means there is less current and the battery lasts longer. Part of the protection circuit prevents the battery from draining to too low of a charge (a very bad thing for Li-PO batteries if i recall correctly) and it registers this with a blinking 510 tip.

    One of my original atty's is still going. I think it may be on its way to burning out (not for a while because it is not in use) its around 1.4Ω. I will post back when it finally dies.
     
  13. imawitch

    imawitch Super Member ECF Veteran

    thanks for the good info

    i was able to test my own atty


    i learn something new each day

    was funny, bcause my dh asked me wth i was doing with his volt meter lol

    guess i showed him lmao
     
  14. invisiblewardog

    invisiblewardog Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 23, 2009
    Virginia, USA
    And with the decreased voltage, longer drags are taken...Human Nature FTW! lol

    It's interesting that the batteries I have checked that are 3.6v really output 4.2 at full charge, and just before they "die" they read 3.6ish. You are right, I believe, in their protection against full discharge. Everything I have read about lithium batteries says intentional full discharge will decrease the life of it.

    Important to note that I test the battery when not under load (pull the battery and connect probes to each end/terminal.) The stick and kissbox don't have an easy way of probing the active circuit.
     
  15. LameBMX

    LameBMX Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 4, 2009
    Stow, OH
    I am pretty sure they are rated at output under discharge. I have never tested that myself. Though they probably are not rated at the level of discharge our low impedance circuits create. So if you decide to take a reading dont be surprised if its below its rating.

    I dont think I posted this but it may be a repeat:

    I finally got a bunk atty! 4Ω and it let me get a not very satisfying hit, it also barely produced any vapor.
     
  16. Fud

    Fud Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Jul 11, 2009
    Hawaii
    But for people using a meter for the first time please to not jam the probe into the coil looking for a reading and jiggling it around. That may cause damage to it. Also if your atty is crusted with sludge the resistance will of course be affected, so make sure it's clean first before you connect the probes.

    Yes I know it's common sence but seen people just jam the pointed probes in other things like they were scrambling eggs.
     
  17. crowntown

    crowntown New Member

    Dec 22, 2009
    Canada
    my atty just quit on me. I tested her out with my multi meter and an getting 3.3k. I have many attys but only brought one with me to work (found out gonna be gone for 5 days not the typical 1 day) so i need to know if its f@cked. The ohms read fine but can't get her to heat up. Any help?
     
  18. LameBMX

    LameBMX Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 4, 2009
    Stow, OH
    3.3K when it should be a lot closer to 3.3 ohms man ... its probably dead.
     
  19. LameBMX

    LameBMX Senior Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 4, 2009
    Stow, OH
    test message for new avatar
     
  20. crowntown

    crowntown New Member

    Dec 22, 2009
    Canada
    Arg well good to know
     

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