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Resistance for coils

Discussion in 'Rebuildable Atomizer Systems' started by chin88, Oct 30, 2012.

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  1. chin88

    chin88 Full Member

    Aug 22, 2012
    Australia
    Hi,

    I am pretty new to this and I recently just got a GGTS with an ody, whenever i wrap my wick, I would just cut an estimate of 2.5cm 32 gauge Kanthal wire and 2 long silver wires to make the coil. May I ask how does this resistance work and how does it affect the vape ? What can I learn so the vaping is really good ? Another question would be should I make a single coil or dual coil for the atomizer ?

    Thanks
    Chin
     
  2. AttyPops

    AttyPops Yeah, I type stuff. ECF Veteran

    Supporting member
    Hmmm. Well, 1st things 1st. Resistance.

    Resistance is like.....a valve on the end of the garden hose. The more resistance to water flow (more closed), the less water.

    So the more resistance to the coil, the less electricity flows. So colder. So lower resistance (ohms) = hotter at any given voltage.

    Voltage = water pressure. So more voltage gets more flow even for a given resistance than lower voltage.

    You should have/get a multimeter to test the ohm rating (resistance rating).

    Dual coil anything requires twice the current since you're powering two coils side-by-side. Voltage is the same, but amps (current flow) doubles. Some devices can't handle it.

    I'd get good at 1 coil before I went to two coils anyway.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. steved5600

    steved5600 Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 7, 2012
    Dallas, Texas
    Here are some things you might find useful.
    Attypops is correct. Volts is to electricity what water pressure is to water. Resistance is to electricity what hose o pipe size is to water. The smaller the hose the greater the resistance. But watts are the goal. Here is a chart, spreadsheets to help with the whole thing.



    P2seQ.jpg View attachment 146831 View attachment resistance wire calc..xlsx

    Oh there is another factor that is amps and like the other post says your battery has a current limit. But if it give a resistance then that is what you have to consider matters not if the coils are in series or parallel but their resistance is important. Low resistance and high voltage gives higher current and wattage. If you want to calculate watts with just resistance/ohms and voltage the formula is (volts squared divided by ohms.
    The usual wattage will be between 4-8 watts but some go higher and it may vary between attys and juice.
     
  4. chin88

    chin88 Full Member

    Aug 22, 2012
    Australia
    Thanks alot, that helped me alot.

    Currently I am using an 18350 battery but I did a dual coil, so that would not be good for the battery ? I did single coil before, but before I knew this information, its like when I wrap more coils, the vape seems weak, did I do anything wrong ?

    Thanks
    Chin
     
  5. steved5600

    steved5600 Ultra Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Sep 7, 2012
    Dallas, Texas
    Oh almost forgot. Since most Pv's do not use true DC but pulsed power there is something called inductive load which doubt matters much in PV batteries. Nice thing about using AC or pulsed voltage is a small wire can carry a higher current load than with true DC. That is why we have AC coming into our homes. I no longer have access to the equipment to measure that in my PV's. I'm doing good to afford a Fluke meter.
     
  6. AttyPops

    AttyPops Yeah, I type stuff. ECF Veteran

    Supporting member
    Depends on how many amps the particular battery is rated for. Mostly Dual-coil stuff works with high-drain IMR batteries (larger ones...like 18650's). IDK what a 18350 puts out for amps. Protected Li-Ion batteries have higher mAh (capacity) but less amps than IMR as a general rule.

    The "weakness" is a function of resistance also. You need that meter to measure the ohms. Note that the ohms would be 1/2 of what you'd get with a single coil (like 2 three-ohm coils would read 1.5 ohms...since they are in parallel...not in series [end to end])
     
  7. chin88

    chin88 Full Member

    Aug 22, 2012
    Australia
    Okay, thanks alot guys, sorry my physics is pretty bad, I have a multimeter, may I ask how do I use it to measure the ohms ? So I make the resis and non resis wire first and then measure it ? What are the recommended ohms I should use ?

    Thanks
    Chin
     
  8. AttyPops

    AttyPops Yeah, I type stuff. ECF Veteran

    Supporting member
    Same as you would for buying an atomizer.

    The Ω symbol is for ohms. It uses the battery in the multimeter to measure the ohms. So it doesn't need power from the e-cig. You can measure the resistance of anything by touching the two probes together to zero out the meter. If it doesn't zero out...remember the reading (like a 0.2 ohms or some such). You'll have to subtract that from the results you get to account for the resistance of the leads. Then, just touch the leads to each end of the wire or to the center post and threads of the atomizer/carto/RBA/Whatever. It will tell you the ohms.

    In the case of measuring a coil...it doesn't matter which way you measure it with regard to black/red (negative/positive). A coil is the same in either direction. Not true with all circuits, but for coils it is.

    Do you have an atty/carto that you like? Measure that. That would be a good starting place.

    The longer the wire, the more ohms. Also more wraps of coil.

    When in doubt....2.3 is about "standard" ohms for stuff. 1.5 is the low end of LR. 2.8 and up is for HV.
     
  9. It Must Feed

    It Must Feed Senior Member Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Aug 30, 2012
    Kingwood, TX
    I have a question - when I create a coil and vape with it, should my coil glow red hot or not glow at all?
     
  10. Croww

    Croww Full Member

    Aug 27, 2012
    Murphysboro, IL
    Red is no good. The coil isn't staying wet enough. Anytime that I get a red glow, a massive punch in the lungs soon follows. Keep it nice and wet and you and your coil will be much better off.
     
  11. Unforeseen

    Unforeseen Admin
    Commercial/Suppliers Asst. Manager
    Admin Verified Member ECF Veteran

    Supporting member
    Moved to Assorted PV Topics - Rebuildable Atomizer Systems
     
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