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I read the whole thread and I was wondering I purchased a custard from a "well known" company so it should be good because it says they steep their juices before hand so they are ready to vape. Well it was true on one flavor but my custard almost has a plastic smell to it. At first I thought it was the coil but then I tried it on my aspire nautilus mini and same chem/plastic taste. I'm a newb to juice almost 3 months cig free.

So I have been keeping the custard in a cool dark place I had the cap off for 24 hours and before I shook it, it smelled like the smell/taste was gone, but no it was back after a good shake. I'm now steeping it where it can get more air with the top just loosely on. I would really like some advice with steeping custards if you do it.

Thank so much!
 

wjosephsimmons

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    I'm not familiar with custards in particular, but in my experience, it frequently takes more than a day of airing out for the plastic/chemical smell to dissipate. If the juice is sold in a plastic bottle, you may want to consider transferring it into a glass bottle (I do that with all my MBV juices as soon as I receive them). Leave the bottle with the cap off in a cool, dark place as you are doing, but replace the cap and shake the bottle vigorously for at least 30 seconds once per day for approximately 3 or 4 days. If after this the smell/taste is still too much, replace the cap tightly and forget about it for a month, checking it weekly if you like. Sometimes a juice can take as long as a month to fully steep.
     

    dannyrl

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      1) Receive my juices
      2) Take a few hits off them to see where they stand in terms of "readiness"
      3) Shake each bottle vigorously until the bubbles in the liquid are tiny
      4) Pull caps off all bottles
      5) Let breathe for the night
      6) Put caps back on and redrip to see if any need to breathe more (checking for chemically taste)
      7) Bottles that no longer have chemically taste just sit on my desk (away from windows or sources of UV light), bottles that still taste chemically repeat steps 3 - 6, and bottles that I really like get vaped.
       

      Mogar

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        (here comes the old internet comment)
        'I was told' by a chemist that the flavorings were a crystalized product that will break down in time and saturate the liquid you put it into. By shaking it and allowing it to stand it will spread to the other juice you have added it to (or had it mixed for you). This is a natural process like putting sugar in tea. Yes I understand that the flavoring is in liquid and not solid form in most cases but the theory remains solid.
         

        wjosephsimmons

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          ...This is a natural process like putting sugar in tea. Yes I understand that the flavoring is in liquid and not solid form in most cases but the theory remains solid.

          I agree. Some juices take on an entirely different flavor (and color) after a few days, some even more after a few weeks. It sometimes has the potential for turning a merely mediocre blend into a really delightful juice. Now all of this can be performed in a few hours instead of days or weeks by putting them in a warm water bath inside an ultrasonic cleaner (as some do), but I'm not prepared to invest a hundred dollars or more in one of those just to steep my juices. The premise, however, is exactly the same. Like slow cooking chili, it may taste even better after a day or two in the refrigerator.
           

          Alien Traveler

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            (here comes the old internet comment)
            'I was told' by a chemist that the flavorings were a crystalized product that will break down in time and saturate the liquid you put it into. By shaking it and allowing it to stand it will spread to the other juice you have added it to (or had it mixed for you). This is a natural process like putting sugar in tea. Yes I understand that the flavoring is in liquid and not solid form in most cases but the theory remains solid.

            Nope. Flavors are completely dissolved in juice from the very beginning. Something more complicated happens, like weak chemical bonds forming (may be).
             

            wjosephsimmons

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              Nope. Flavors are completely dissolved in juice from the very beginning. Something more complicated happens, like weak chemical bonds forming (may be).

              I respectfully but wholeheartedly disagree. To suggest that flavors are completely dissolved in juice from the very beginning is an overgeneralization. It all depends on the ingredients used. Some liquids are simply more miscible than others. When a liquid can completely dissolve in another liquid, the two liquids are considered miscible. Miscibility is the property of substances to mix in all proportions, forming a homogeneous solution. Since flavors are in fact compound substances, it varies by the substances used, and by the proportions of these substances to each other. That is not to suggest that other chemical reactions or bonds may not also occur; every different substance, however, has a different degree of solubility.
               
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              Alien Traveler

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                I respectfully but wholeheartedly disagree. To suggest that flavors are completely dissolved in juice from the very beginning is an overgeneralization. It all depends on the ingredients used. Some liquids are simply more miscible than others. When a liquid can completely dissolve in another liquid, the two liquids are considered miscible. Miscibility is the property of substances to mix in all proportions, forming a homogeneous solution. Since flavors are in fact compound substances, it varies by the substances used, and by the proportions of these substances to each other. That is not to suggest that other chemical reactions or bonds may not also occur; every different substance, however, has a different degree of solubility.

                Flavors are already dissolved in PG or alcohol when they are put in juice. PG and VG are miscibile, so no problems at all with solubility.
                 

                wjosephsimmons

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                  Flavors are already dissolved in PG or alcohol when they are put in juice. PG and VG are miscibile, so no problems at all with solubility.

                  PG and VG are miscible, but how miscible are the flavorings used? The solubility of a substance fundamentally depends on the physical and chemical properties of the solute and solvent as well as on temperature, pressure and the pH of the solution. Recipes for juices (and preferences for how much flavor is used, as well as their ingredients) vary widely, and this is proportionate to the amount of PG and/or VG to which it is added. In a stable environment, it may take significantly shorter or longer periods of time for an optimal or ideal degree of saturation to occur. This is why steeping a juice may result in significant differences in taste. :)
                   
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                  Alien Traveler

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                    PG and VG are miscible, but how miscible are the flavorings used? The solubility of a substance fundamentally depends on the physical and chemical properties of the solute and solvent as well as on temperature, pressure and the pH of the solution. Recipes for juices (and preferences for how much flavor is used, as well as their ingredients) vary widely, and this is proportionate to the amount of PG and/or VG to which it is added. In a stable environment, it may take significantly shorter or longer periods of time for an optimal or ideal degree of saturation to occur. This is why steeping a juice may result in significant differences in taste. :)

                    Yes, there are many variables we may play with (but not with pH - it exists only for aqueous solutions which juices are not). However nearly all flavorings come already in dissolved state. You suggest that they precipitate when added to a base solution. Making DIY juices I have never seen something like this (and it just do not make sense). Adding small amount of PG-dissolved staff to a much bigger volume of PG (like in 50-50 juice) should not make things worse.
                     

                    ABx009

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                      There are so many different chemicals that can be used for flavoring, made for different uses (e.g., food vs perfume vs various extracts), can you really make any blanket statements? Wouldn't it depend largely on what it is, the extraction method, the base, etc? Perhaps the flavorings you use are different from ones that need steeping, just as some liquids don't really need steeping.

                      I've had some liquid that you could see things like the coloring (for example) float to the top repeatedly for the first couple of weeks (after which it would stay mixed evenly). I also have liquids (especially Halo) that will produce very different results if not shaken well before use (which I believe stops after a couple of weeks).
                       

                      wjosephsimmons

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                        I see what you are saying regarding saturation (ie. the point at which a solution of a substance can dissolve no more of that substance, and additional amounts of it will appear as a precipitate). In physical chemistry that is correct, but that's not what I'm saying. What I'm saying is that below that point, even soluble substances may take different periods of time to completely dissolve, and it may occur at a variable rate or speed the closer it approaches or approximates saturation. This seems at least just as likely as the formation of weak chemical bonds. How else can you account for the effects of steeping? It's not exactly a singular phenomenon.
                         
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